Café Community

The Mother Trees

October 9, 2021

CBS

Northern California wildfires may have killed hundreds of giant sequoias as they swept through groves of the majestic monarchs in the Sierra Nevada, an official says.

“It’s heartbreaking,” said Christy Brigham, head of resource management and science for Sequoia and Kings Canyon national parks.

The lightning-caused KNP Complex that erupted on Sept. 9 has burned into 15 giant sequoia groves in the park, Brigham said.

More than 2,000 firefighters were battling the blaze in sometimes treacherous terrain. On Wednesday afternoon, four people working on the fire were injured when a tree fell on them, the National Park Service reported.

The four were airlifted to hospitals and “while the injuries are serious, they are in stable condition,” the report said. It didn’t provide other details.

The KNP Complex was only 11% contained after burning 134 square miles of forest. Cooler weather has helped slow the flames and the area could see some slight rain on Friday, forecasters said.

The fire’s impact on giant sequoia groves was mixed. Most saw low- to medium-intensity fire behavior that the sequoias have evolved to survive, Brigham said.

However, it appeared that two groves – including one with 5,000 trees – were seared by high-intensity fire that can send up 100-foot flames capable of burning the canopies of the towering trees.

That leaves the monarchs at risk of going up “like a horrible Roman candle,” Brigham said.

Two burned trees fell in Giant Forest, which is home to about 2,000 sequoias, including the General Sherman Tree, which is considered the world’s largest by volume. However, the most notable trees survived and Brigham said the grove appeared to be mostly intact.

In one grove, Dickman counted 29 sequoias that were “just incinerated,” he told CNN.

“There were four of those that had burned so hot that they’d fallen over,” he said.

The 152-acre fire was 75% contained.

cbsnews.com

Highly recommend:

Imagine if Zuckerberg and the media spent as much energy and time covering the climate emergency, our planet, our dear Gaia, as they do the former president and hateful, divisive rhetoric. Imagine. Two senators, two, tied to fossil fuel and special interests, dark money, may proclude our ability to change this awful climate trajectory. Zero compassion for Earth and humanity’s future. They. Do. Not. Care. Only power, greed, self-interest. I live in Idaho. Our elected leaders do not represent their constituents, only the GOP and their lobbyists. They will do nothing. -dayle

“Then shall all the trees of the forest sing for joy before the Lord.

1 Chronicles 16:33

🙋‍♀️

September 19, 2021

GQ

A cabin at Table Mountain Ranch with a geodesic dome.

The Last Glimpses of California’s Vanishing Hippie Utopias
Half a century ago, a legion of idealists dropped out of society and went back to the land, creating a patchwork of utopian communes across Northern California. Here, the last of those rogue souls offer a glimpse of their otherworldly residences—and the tail end of a grand social experiment.

There was an aphorism in the movement: “Bad roads make good communes.” And the road we’re on today is bad. Several miles inland from California’s foggy coastline, we’re driving down a single lane hemmed in by 50-foot fir trees and then turn onto a rocky dirt path, joggling our rented SUV. Photographer Michael Schmelling and I are in Mendocino County, about a three-hour drive north of San Francisco, looking for what remains of perhaps the most famous of the hundreds of rural communes established across Northern California in the late ’60s and ’70s: Table Mountain Ranch.

The entire expanse—which once was a kind of American Arcadia, home to scores of hippies who’d fled San Francisco to live a new, idealistic kind of life

At one point in 1970, Table Mountain had over a hundred residents, some living in tipis, some in cabins, some crashing in the open air. It appears that before it became a commune, the 120-acre property had been a dude ranch, and the cabins and outbuildings were constantly being expanded in an endless ad hoc construction project.

It’s common in Northern California to find people who abruptly dropped out of society, never to return.

A deserted cabin at Table Mountain Ranch.

https://www.gq.com/story/californias-vanishing-hippie-utopias 

 

 

S C I E N C E 🦠

March 22, 2021

Scientific breakthroughs are exhilarating and in recognition of brilliant minds joining with the collective spirit to benefit all species. Let’s do this! And with open minds and hearts for the common good.

Highly recommend Walter Isaacson’s latest book, Code Breaker. (Mind boggling the body of work, depth, research and writing Isaacson continues to share.)

This book illustrates clearly the symmetry of knowledge and research made manifest in the discoveries of CRISPR.

Also, the documentary film ‘Human Nature’ streaming on Netflix is a wonderful precursor for Isaacson’s book, produced by journalist Dan Rather.

This important read from The Atlantic dropped on the 19th gives understanding to COVID, vaccinations and the increasing variants in relation to the vaccine and what scientists are working on now.

 

THE ATLANTIC

SCIENCE

KATHERINE J. WU

 

Don’t Be Surprised When Vaccinated People Get Infected

Post-immunization cases, sometimes called “breakthroughs,” are very rare and very expected.

 

“Breakthrough infections, which occur when fully vaccinated people are infected by the pathogen that their shots were designed to protect against, are an entirely expected part of any vaccination process. They’re the data points that keep vaccines from reaching 100 percent efficacy in trials; they’re simple proof that no inoculation is a perfect preventative. And so far, the ones found after COVID-19 vaccination seem to be unextraordinary.

When breakthrough cases do arise, it’s not always clear why. The trio of vaccines now circulating in the United States were all designed around the original coronavirus variant, and seem to be a bit less effective against some newer versions of the virus. These troublesome variants have yet to render any of our current vaccines obsolete. But “the more variants there are, the more concern you have for breakthrough cases,” Saad Omer, a vaccine expert at Yale, told me. The circumstances of exposure to any version of the coronavirus will also make a difference. If vaccinated people are spending time with groups of unvaccinated people in places where the virus is running rampant, that still raises their chance of getting sick. Large doses of the virus can overwhelm the sturdiest of immune defenses, if given the chance.

The human side of the equation matters, too. Immunity is not a monolith, and the degree of defense roused by an infection or a vaccine will differ from person to person, even between identical twins. Some people might have underlying conditions that hamstring their immune system’s response to vaccination; others might simply, by chance, churn out fewer or less potent antibodies and T cells that can nip a coronavirus infection in the bud.”

 

Bottom line: the more folks who are vaccinated the less chance the variants continue to mutate off of each other. We need, at the very least, a base line of vaccinations. This isn’t political, or scary, it’s science.

As of March 19th, 40 million American’s have received full vaccinations. [The Atlantic]

 

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/03/vaccine-breakthrough-cases/618330/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=atlantic-weekly-newsletter&utm_content=20210321&silverid-ref=NDA5MjcxMTc3Nzc4S0

 

Idaho’s Dr. Fauci

March 4, 2021

Dr. David Pate serves on the Idaho COVID task force. He is the former President & CEO of St. Luke’s Health, receiving an MD in internal medicine from Baylor College of Medicine, and a JD in health from  University of Houston Law Center.

Many of us who live in Idaho are exhausted by a politically polarized legislature, none more than Dr. Pate who continually puts the health of Idahoans first, while the state legislature does not. (Many whom are less than intellectually sound and gravitate to red hats, but, hey, that’s a personal take.)

Here is a recent thread from Dr. Pate’s twitter feed as we head into a potential fourth wave of COVID while states like Mississippi and Texas reverse mask mandates and open businesses. Idaho just introduced legislation this week that would eliminate mask mandates in certain communities, like Blaine County and McCall. Governor Brad Little never implemented a state-wide mask mandate. -dayle

Dr. Pate:

As Idaho Republicans keep introducing bills, I have to continue to rearrange to a new one to the list of stupidest bills. This is ridiculous. Legislation Introduced That Would ban Mask Mandates in Idaho.

~

I warned school board members in the middle of February: Please don’t commit to bringing students back for full in-person classes given admin admitted that we would have to decrease physical distancing. I warned that the UK variant behaves differently in schools and it is likely to become the dominant strain right as you plan to bring all these students back. At that time, the UK variant accounted for about 1% of cases. Today, just two weeks later it accounts for an estimated 10% of cases.

That is a doubling time of 5.6 days.

Using some simple math – with West Ada’s plan to bring everyone back in 26 days – that would mean 4.5 more doubling times = the UK variant will indeed be the predominant strain, in fact, unless we find that one of the other variants (maybe the California variant?), out-competes it, it will completely replace the previous variants on which their whole operating plan was based. I should know- I wrote it. 

This variant [P1] has shown up next door, Idaho. I guarantee you this is not the time to give up masks & physical distancing, & I have no idea why elected leaders think we should have larger gatherings. Brazil’s Covid Crisis Is a Warning to the Whole World.

Brazil is seeing a record number of deaths, and the spread of a more contagious coronavirus variant that may cause reinfection.

Dr. Pate can be heard on Boise State Public Radio’s ‘Idaho Matters’, every Wednesday, KBSX radio, or online streaming. Also available via podcast.

https://www.boisestatepublicradio.org/#stream/0

~

From the Washington Post this afternoon, 3.4.21:

Health officials continue to criticize Texas and Mississippi’s moves to rescind mask mandates and let businesses operate at full capacity. 

The nation’s top infectious-disease expert, Anthony S. Fauci, called the choices “ill-advised,” while some local officials begged residents to keep wearing face coverings. Previously plummeting infection totals in the United States have stalled in recent days, possibly because in part to the spread of more contagious variants. 

Many businesses in Texas and Mississippi were quick to remove their “masks required” signs, but some of the country’s biggest retailers – including Target and Starbucks –  said they would continue to mandate masks in their Texas stores to protect front-line workers and customers. 

Meanwhile, Europe is also experiencing an end to six weeks of declining case numbers as the virus mounts an unwelcome resurgence. New cases have risen by 9 percent in the past week, with central and eastern Europe impacted the most. World Health Organization officials attributed some of the increase to a more contagious variant, first detected in the United Kingdom, that is driving an outbreak in the Czech Republic and Hungary. 

~

From Dr. Anthony Fauci:

Public health officials have been warning of a possible fourth wave of the pandemic should the nation let its guard down, especially since the seven-day average of new cases remains at roughly 65,000 in the U.S.

“I don’t know why they’re doing it, but it’s certainly from a public health standpoint ill-advised.” If you look at, right now, the curves of the diminution of infections that are going down, it’s reached the point where the last seven days have plateaued. We’ve been to this scene before, months and months ago when we tried to open up the country and open up the economy, when certain states did not abide by the guidelines, we had rebounds that were very troublesome.”

Earlier in the day, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Rochelle Walensky acknowledged that a year of restrictions was helping to fuel a worrisome change in behavior.

“Stamina has worn thin,” Walensky said during a press briefing Wednesday morning. “Fatigue is winning, and the exact measures we have taken to stop the pandemic are now too often being flagrantly ignored.” [Yahoo News]

 

Bruce’s community.

January 15, 2021

‘The first half of Bruce Springsteen’s autobiography makes some things abundantly clear:

He had no natural ability to play the guitar. In fact, after his first lessons, he quit, unable to play a note.

He had no singing talent. Every group he was part of needed a lead singer, and it wasn’t him.

And just about everyone dismissed him. Audiences walked out, his first agent simply stopped returning his calls and bandmates gave up and moved on.

He didn’t even know how to drive a car. Not only wasn’t he dating in high school, he wasn’t even cruising around town, being a charismatic rock star.

Talent is overrated. Skill is acquirable.

Showing up is something almost every creative leader has in common. In business, in the arts, in society. Consistently shipping the work, despite the world’s reaction, despite the nascent nature of our skill, despite the doubts.

And community is essential. The people you surround yourself with can reinforce your story, raise the bar and egg you on.

After the fact, the community becomes an integral part of your story of success. But first, you have to commit to the journey.’

-Seth Godin, author

“Writing about yourself is a funny business…but in a project like this, the writer has made one promise, to show the reader his mind.”

-Bruce

Can we agree at least on this?

Ketchum Idaho’s Community Library

December 30, 2020

Knitting Yarns and Years

Nancy’s Christmas stocking was the biggest. When we three little girls hung our stockings from small hooks in the fireplace mantel each December, my middle sister’s stocking unfurled an extra turn – it was at least two inches longer and wider than either my own or my youngest sister’s – and it therefore always stirred some controversy. Everything else was equal across all three: each woven of the same green, red, and white yarns; each with a Santa dancing on the front; each with our own name stitched in block letters at the top. But Nancy’s stocking was undeniably bigger, and the other two of us fretted that Santa would be tricked into giving her more. (And we worried that this proved she was the favorite.)
My great-aunt Gloria had knitted each of our stockings, from the same bundles of yarn, following the same pattern for each. She had five children of her own; she knew the necessity of equal measures.
But life does not unfurl in equal measures, and Gloria knitted each stocking at a different time, as each one of her grand-nieces was born. She cast-on Nancy’s stocking in a hospital waiting room while her husband had open heart surgery. I imagine her tiny four-feet-some-inches frame, perched in a straight-back chair, her dark bob of hair falling alongside her tilted head, and her hands clicking wooden needles, again and again, giving shape to her waiting as the yarn unspooled. I imagine the release of her fingers when he awoke.
That stocking made our Christmas row uneven, but it had steadied Gloria’s mind while she created it. I did not recognize as a child that stocking’s true outsized capacity. It has room for heartache, and for hope.
We need this capacity, and stories offer it beyond any stocking: Each turn of a book’s pages can help knit the messiness of our days into a pattern. A string of words can help hold the weight of waiting as another year unfurls. A story stretches our capacity to hold more than we could hold alone.
Jenny Emery Davidson, Ph.D.
Executive Director

www.comlib.org

jai

December 27, 2020

“We are reaping what we have sown. Let’s replant.”

-Mariane Williamson

🌱

tikkun olam

A repaired world; a partnership between the generations.

Peninsula College

December 2, 2020

Would love to have you join us! ~dayle

Public Speaking Workshop

Discover skills you already have in this two-day introductory course to Professional Public Speaking.

About this Event

Meets: Monday and Wednesday

Dates: January 13 and January 15

Format: Zoom Classroom

Instructor: Dayle Ohlau

“According to most studies, people’s number one fear is public speaking. Number two is death. This means to the average person, if you go to a funeral, you’re better off in the casket than doing the eulogy.” – Comedian Jerry Seinfeld

Professional public speaking is not a death wish! We’re going to keep you out of the box and brighten the skills you didn’t even know you already have in this two-day introductory course to Professional Public Speaking.

Research indicates that oral communication skills are the number one factor in employment success, beyond self-motivation, problem-solving, decision-making, and leadership skills. This class will help you strengthen your ability to communicate effectively in a professional environment. The instructor, Dayle Ohlau, has taught various college-level communication classes and formerly hosted and produced radio programs in southern California, as well as a CBS-TV news program in Northern Michigan. For this course she will focus on verbal, non-verbal, and listening communication skills with an emphasis on interpersonal and small-group dynamics.

Required: Computer with a microphone and the ability to download the zoom add-on to a PC, tablet, or phone.

[A full class will be offered in February.]

Instructor Biography:

Dayle Ohlau is a native of San Diego, California, living in Sun Valley, Idaho for the past 20 years. She is an adjunct professor in communications and public speaking with a 37-year background in radio and TV broadcasting. Dayle majored in communications at DePauw University in Indiana, and human behavior for her Master’s Degree in San Diego. She is currently working on her PhD with the California Institution of Integral Studies in San Francisco.

To register, follow the link:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/public-speaking-workshop-registration-131264137569

Peninsula College is a public community college in Port Angeles, Washington, on the Olympic Peninsula. It serves Clallam and Jefferson Counties and extends from the Pacific Ocean at Neah Bay to Brinnon on Hood Canal. It was founded in 1961 by a group of local citizens.

https://pencol.edu

#NationalVoterRegistrationDay

September 22, 2020

Roe v. Wade.

Health care.

Climate change.

Dreamers.

Voting.

The right to join a union.

 

💉

September 13, 2020

Eye On Sun Valley

“Dr. Anthony Fauci calls it the most important flu shot you will ever get.”

Health officials recommend you get a flu shot any time after Sept. 15 into early October. Only 47% of Americans got the flu vaccine last year—Idaho ranked 4th lowest in the nation for children flu vaccination [American Academy of Pediatrics.] Rhode Island has the highest rate with 76 percent.

Health officials want to avoid a twindemic, in which those sick with flu will inundate health clinics and hospitals at the same time people are seeking care for COVID.

Or, worse yet, cases in which someone contracts both COVID and flu at the same time.

Having flu makes one more susceptible to getting COVID. And getting both could be exponentially more serious, as both can cause pneumonia, respiratory inflammation of the heart, brain or muscle tissues and other maladies.

https://eyeonsunvalley.com/Mobile/Mobile_Story_Reader?StoryId=7604

Blaine County Idaho’s seven-day moving average remains low with just 0.4 cases per day on average, says Paul Ries.

Only 45% of American’s wear masks to guard against COVID.

 

The exodus…to Idaho.

“For the first time in a decade, more people left California last year for other states than arrived.”

AXIOS

  • Climate scientist Zeke Hausfather said: “People who have lived in California for 30, 40 years are saying this is unprecedented, it has never been this hot, it has never been this smoky.”

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D), on Friday: “California, folks, is America — fast forward.” (ABC’s “This Week”)

San Francisco this past week.

[Photo: Nick Otto for The Washington Post, via Getty Images]

Boise/Idaho Statesman:

‘A line formed last Saturday outside a newly listed home for sale in Meridian—they had people lined up in the streets and in their cars all day.  I was told by a neighbor that the house went under contract with four full-cash offers the same day.

The asking price: $540,000.

https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/business/article245659170.html

“Idaho dodged a bullet this year,” one climatologist said. “It’s hard to not expect that Idaho’s time will come soon.” Idaho is up there with California as the state in the lower 48 that has the most fire in general.”

Whether Idaho wildfires will prove to be as destructive and fatal as those in neighboring states remains to be seen, but experts say they’ll almost certainly burn more of our state than they have in years past.

Part of Idaho’s exploding wildfire problem is that we got a little too good at putting fires out. That created an excess of fuel, even in places like Idaho’s forests, which are less inclined to burn than the Great Basin that stretches into Southern Idaho.

“The warming and drying climate is basically exposing that legacy of fire suppression,” Abatzoglou said. “We often talk about these forests having a deficit of fire, and the warming and drying climate is making us pay that debt back.”

More:

https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/local/environment/fires/article245634450.html

Washington Post

Dense smoke smothers Pacific Northwest, shutting residents indoors and complicating fire response

‘Officials and health experts urged residents to stay indoors unless absolutely necessary, keep doors and windows closed, and use fans and air conditioners to keep air circulating in their homes.’

 

#911Remembered

September 11, 2020

‘Dear darkening ground, you’ve endured so patiently the walls we’ve built, perhaps you’ll give the cities one more hour.’

~Rilke

Coronado, California

We don’t get over loss or tragedy.

“We learn to hold them both at the same time. in an open mind and heart, at the same time. In an open mind and heart, there is room for both.”

~Sharon Saltzberg

Dalai Lama about 9/11: ‘It happened.’ 📿

‘Don’t try to see or force yourself to see the traumas of your past as gifts. They are givens.’

-Roshi Joan Halifax

‘An absence of compassion can corrupt the decency of a community, a state, a nation. Fear and anger can make us vindictive, abusive, unjust, unfair, until we all suffer from the absence of mercy.’

~Bryan Stevenson

Unmerited Grace.

 

Climate and Covid and Lies

September 9, 2020

“Days like today are when revolutions are born. A better world is possible.”

-Eric Holthaus, author and climate correspondent

[Photo taken in Ketchum, Idaho.]

Anita votes yes. ✔️

September 5, 2020

CNN

‘Anita Hill vows to vote for Joe Biden and will work with him on gender issues if he becomes president.’

“…it’s not just because he’s running against Donald Trump. It’s more about the survivors of gender violence. That’s really what it’s about. And if that means voting for and working with Joe Biden, then so be it.”

Anita Hill never pictured herself voting for Joe Biden.But given the political reality the nation is facing, she’s not only going to vote for Biden — she’s also willing to work with him, should he become president.

“Notwithstanding all of his limitations in the past, and the mistakes that he made in the past, notwithstanding those — at this point, between Donald Trump and Joe Biden, I think Joe Biden is the person who should be elected in November,” Hill told CNN’s Gloria Borger.

“My commitment is to finding solutions, and I am more than willing to work with him,” Hill said.

She’d like to work on issues of sexual harassment, gender violence and gender discrimination.

Hill and Biden have a troubled history dating back nearly three decades: In 1991, Biden was chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and oversaw the confirmation hearing of then-US Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. Hill was the star witness, testifying that Thomas sexually harassed her when they worked together at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Thomas denied the allegations.
Hill said those hearings permanently altered her life.

For Hill, the public declaration of a willingness to work inside government is a sea change.

“One of the impacts of 1991 was my desire not to really work with the government in any way,” Hill said. “I always said, I think I can be more effective as an outsider, as opposed to an insider. And now, I’m willing to evolve myself, to work for change inside.”

Hill insisted this is bigger than her — and bigger than Biden.

“What drives me is the people who have experienced [those issues] and the people who will be experiencing them, if we don’t do something about it,” Hill said. “That is what has opened me up to do something that I probably would not have said I would do a year ago.”

As the chairman, Biden has long defended himself against complaints that he didn’t take Hill’s allegations seriously enough, and that he didn’t step in to intervene when the hearings devolved into a circus-like atmosphere in which Hill was humiliated. The panel of all-male senators grilled her on her accusations in painful detail, and they called into question her own personal character.

“I believed her story from the very beginning,” Biden told CNN in an exclusive 90-minute interview in July. “I wish I could have protected her more. … I did get in shouting matches, as you’ll remember, with some of the witnesses who were saying things that were off the wall.”

Hill says she believes Biden lost control. But Biden maintains he did not allow his Republican colleagues to take over the hearings.

“I don’t think I did,” he said. “I wish I could have done it differently under the rules. But when it ended, I was determined to do two things. One, make sure never again would there not be women on the committee. … And I was determined to continue and finish writing and passing the Violence Against Women Act.”

Biden said he has apologized to Hill. The two spoke on the phone shortly before Biden launched his presidential campaign in April 2019.

After the call, Hill told The New York Times she would not characterize it as an apology. She still hesitates to use that word to describe it.

“An apology, to be real and sincere, has to take responsibility for harm,” Hill told CNN. That’s not what she heard when she spoke to him at the time. She wanted to hear him acknowledge the harm done to victims of sexual harassment. “He didn’t take responsibility. He didn’t hold himself accountable in any way, except that he was sorry that I felt I wasn’t treated fairly. He didn’t take ownership of his own role as chair of the committee.”

She called the conversation “unsatisfying.” After that call, Biden told ABC’s Good Morning America that he acknowledged his role as chairman in her treatment.
“As the committee chairman, I take responsibility that she did not get treated well. I take responsibility for that,” Biden told ABC in April 2019.

Hill was listening. She now says she believes he’s evolved.

“There was a statement about ‘I take accountability; I hold myself responsible for the way the hearing was run,'” Hill said. “And so that, I think, is as close as we’ve gotten, you know, and that’s good. That’s an opening.”

And that is something Hill says she’s willing to work with.

“I want the next president to be somebody that I can go to and talk about the real issues that women, men, and non-binary people are experiencing with violence in this country, that’s directed to them because of their gender,” Hill said.

“I believe that Joe Biden would be that person. I do not believe that Donald Trump would be the person who would hear me.”

Community Voice

September 3, 2020

“No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted” – Aesop

Community Radio

I met Felix Belmont when I was teenager. He was a recent retiree who moved to our town and got involved in starting our community radio station. Over the decades that he devoted himself to the station he raised thousands of dollars, hosted a music show, interviewed the County Commissioners every month, hosted a wildly popular call in show about financial management, and served on the governing board multiple times. In 2011, at 93 years old, he was honored by NFCB with the Volunteer of the Year Award and a whole group of people from my hometown were there to cheer him on as he knocked it out of the park with his moving speech.
 
Felix is 102 now and pretty much sharp as a tack. Last week he loaded up in the car with his daughter Louise to move to her place in Indiana. It was just time and we all knew it. People lined the main street to wave goodbye and smile through their masks. He had a police escort that stopped in front of the radio station building (which is named after him), so that well-wishers could honor him and intrepid reporters could collect the audio. As the caravan moved out toward the highway, our community choir was there to surround the car and sing “Auld Lang Syne,” “America the Beautiful,” and “I’ll Be Seeing You.” There was hardly a dry eye, and as a member of the choir, I can tell you that “Auld Lang Syne” nearly did me in. The final salute was the flashing highway sign that proclaimed “We Love You Felix” as he rolled out of town.
 
I could write volumes about my many conversations and adventures with Felix over the 40 years I have known him but there isn’t time for that here. I simply wanted to paint the picture of an ordinary man who was kind and showed up for his community, and in his own way changed the world. He changed my world, he changed the community, he changed the station. I asked him many times what the station meant to him and he gave basically the same answer every time, “KVNF is family to me. They accept me for who I am and help me feel that I belong to something that matters.”
 
As the scope and complexity of the challenges we face unleash fear and trepidation, my hope is that we remember the transformative power of community radio and the friendship it amplifies and uplifts every single day across this country. There is simple beauty in that… even in the most complicated times.

Sally Kane, CEO, National Federation of Community Broadcasters

Community Radio for the Wood River Valley, Sun Valley, Idaho.

KDPI is a local non-profit community radio station. It is a broadcast platform for collective voice operated by volunteers in the community. We also serve as a platform for eclectic music, information, and education, providing a medium for the hundreds of non-profit organizations in our Wood River Valley.

 

November 3rd:

August 31, 2020

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Your Rights, Your Vote

This November, whether you choose to vote by mail or at your polling place, you have rights when making your voice heard. Here are a few things to keep in mind if you decide

to cast your ballot in person:

  • If the polls close while you’re in line, stay in line. You can still vote.
  • Under federal law, you have the right to receive help at the polls if you’re a voter with a disability or have difficulty reading or writing in English.
  • If an election worker can’t find your name on the list of registered voters, you’re still entitled to a provisional ballot.
  • If you experience voter intimidation (a federal crime), such as aggressive questioning about your citizenship status, criminal record, or voting record, you can report it to the nonpartisan Election Protection Hotline at 866-OUR-VOTE.

To learn more about your rights while traveling, working, protesting, and more, visit aclu.org/kyr.

Sun Valley loses a beloved friend.

August 30, 2020

Todd Anthony Rippo
1964 – 2020

“The edge…There is no honest way to explain it because the only people who know where it really is are the ones who have gone over…”
– Hunter S. Thompson

Todd Anthony Rippo was born on December 14th, 1964 in San Diego California. A true native San Diegan, his early years were spent in Point Loma, Ocean Beach, Mission Hills, La Jolla, Del Mar and Rancho Santa Fe. He received a bachelor’s degree from UC San Diego.

Todd was a rock star in every sense of the word. Music was his pulse. He awoke each morning with a song in his head and had an uncanny ability to spontaneously riff remarkable lyrics. Band night with Todd was legendary. His taste in music was original and eclectic. You never knew if Miles Davis, Bowie or Hiss Golden Messenger would be spinning on his old-school turntable while he enjoyed a cigar. In 2018, Todd released his first album, “Thought I Knew You.” This was a compilation of many of his favorite original songs. The album is a raw and soulful glimpse into Todd’s captivating mind, his life and his loves.

Todd was larger than life. His remarkable energy captivated all who met and knew him. Todd was always the coolest guy in the room, but not for the reasons one often associates with the word. He was cool because he was both unsettlingly powerful and profoundly fragile all at once. Todd was fearless and brave, yet had no fear of showing you his vulnerabilities. He was the epitome of manliness, yet fostered and proudly displayed his feminine side simultaneously.

A beautiful man, he was generous, sexy, elegant and romantic. Todd was a deep thinker, inquisitive, complex and clever. He was superstitious, stubborn, spiritual, political and soulful. He was remarkably intelligent, funny and fiercely loyal to those he loved. When Todd loved you, you felt chosen. He was magic. There wasn’t a disingenuous bone in his body. He was a profoundly sensitive old soul.
He had a singular, enviable sense of style and impeccable taste. Aside from music, Todd loved art, passionate and creative people, skateboards, dive bars, live concerts, socks, beach walks, leather jackets, a chain wallet, motorcycles, beautiful women, a great cigar and a “good” margarita. He kept treasures and talismans in his pockets – a coin given to him by his Navy Seal friends, a knife from his father and a Chimayo cross from his sister.

Todd loved his home. It was a magical place to gather for sunsets, Todd’s “Almost Famous Cookies” and cigar nights lasting well into the night. His house was full of albums, art, trinkets and mementos from his colorful life – heart rocks, beach glass, cigar wrappers, flowers, candles, pinup girls, musical instruments, interesting books, hot wheels, peanut M&Ms, icons of every sort and a well-adorned jackalope at the top of the stairs.

Todd had beautiful, singular friends in this life’s journey – people that loved him dearly and whose love he reciprocated with equal passion. He had magical stories of traveling the world and told remarkable tales of the characters he met and the music he heard along the way. Todd always said, “I love you.” He often cried. Todd greeted you with a bear hug and a kiss.

Todd adored his beautiful daughter, “Frankie” Francesca Rippo. She was the light and love of his life. He beamed with pride when she rode on the back of his motorcycle or learned to skateboard, ski or surf. They shared a love of music and had their own language. He was so proud to be anywhere with Frankie. Their connection profound, Todd was a “Rad Dad.”

The Idaho Java coffee shops – located in Ketchum, Hailey, Boise and Twin Falls – are his legacy. It all started with pre-law student Todd studying in coffee shops in San Diego. Todd fell in love with the coffee culture. He bought a motorcycle and took some time off of school to figure out his life. That motorcycle took him out of California and to the front door of what is now Java on Fourth in Ketchum, Idaho. You could be anywhere – any random place in the world – and someone would always recognize the “guy from Java.” Todd was and still is the heartbeat, soul and rock & roll of this thriving business.

Todd passed away in his home in Del Mar, CA on Wednesday, August 19, 2020. Todd was proceeded in death by Anthony J. Rippo, MD. He is survived by his daughter Francesca Rippo, mother Madeline D’Atri Rippo, father Rick Maxey, sister Annie “Belle” Rippo-VeneKlasen, brothers Tobin and Josh Rippo, step brothers and sisters and innumerable in-laws, aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews.

Todd’s departure from this life will leave a lasting void in all our lives. He was the brightest of shooting stars. Fly free, soar with the angels and rock the heavens Todd.

https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/idahostatesman/obituary.aspx?n=todd-anthony-rippo&pid=196714659


 

1920-2020

August 25, 2020

“…buildings and landmarks across the country will light up in purple and gold on Wed., Aug. 26th as part of the Commission’s nationwide campaign, named in honor of the historic suffrage slogan, “Forward through the Darkness, Forward into Light.”

https://www.womensvote100.org

Ketchum, Idaho

August 23, 2020

#SaveUSPS

 

 

Pretty much.


‘No Body of Men:’ A militia movement, recast, takes to the streets of North Idaho

“This has been just the gasoline on the fire for civil war. If it’s coming, North Idaho is the heart of the new confederacy.”-Rebecca Schroeder

Rebecca Schroeder, Idaho progressive activist, has gone into hiding with her 13-year-old because of death threats from the right-wing extremists in Northern Idaho.
To understand these gatherings, where they came from, and their ramifications, the Statesman interviewed local officials and residents of Coeur d’Alene and Sandpoint, as well as experts studying the militia movement and representatives from human rights groups. Every militia group the Statesman reached out to declined to comment for this story, except for the Seven Bravo 3% Militia. Seven Bravo’s leader, Ron Korn, said the recent gatherings have led to a “huge influx of people finally wanting to get involved” in the militia movement.

For North Idaho residents like Schroeder, who have watched warily as armed militia groups gain a foothold in their town, the area’s history — the leveled Aryan Nations compound lies just seven miles from Coeur d’Alene — doesn’t feel so far away.

“They have been calling for a civil war for a long time. I mean, this is a perfect excuse. The Black Lives Matter protests layered in with the COVID pandemic and the restrictions placed on movement and masking and things like that in our community,” Schroeder said.

When Rebecca Schroeder reported the increase in death threats — she estimates she’s blocked 1,000 people on Facebook in the past month — to the police department and to various levels of leadership in the city, she received no offer of protection.

“I needed to get the hell out of town,” she said. “There wasn’t anyone in local leadership who was going to hold these folks accountable.”

Schroeder says combating right-wing extremism in North Idaho could be like firing at a shifting target.

“Because it’s hidden under this guise of ‘patriotism,’ and it kind of co-opted that word and that identity, it’s much more difficult to single out and oppose those folks,” Schroeder said.

For (one resident), who previously hoped to retire in Coeur d’Alene, the recent trend toward open right-wing extremism has also become untenable. After events this summer, he no longer wants his granddaughter to visit. He plans to sell his house and leave town for good as soon as possible.

https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/northwest/idaho/article244699972.html?

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