NASA

Dayle in Limoux – Day #30

August 4, 2022

As I prepare my next exploration, I found a great website in my research today written by Val Wineyard. https://marymagdalenebooks.blog4ever.com She lives in the Languedoc region and studies the history of all things Occitanie, including the Visigoths. She writes,

My previous life was of Visigothic descent.  I decided to find out more about the Visigoths here in our region of Languedoc, the old Visigothic kingdom of Septimanie.  I was so fascinated by this I wrote a book called ‘The Visigothic Inheritance’ and am now working on another, ‘Barbarian Gold.’  Recently I started a blog all about the Visigoths, these little known and badly judged people.  

I had long been interested in Rennes-le-Château, deep in the hills to the south of Carcassonne, because it was founded by the Visigoths.  As a mysterious centre it is endless – one mystery leads onto another;  especially when you enter the church and see for yourself how the unusual priest loved Mary Magdalene.  The whole village is devoted to her.

My conviction that the priest of Rennes-le-Chateau knew something that we didn’t about Mary Magdalene inspired me to write ‘Mary, Jesus and the Charismatic Priest’ and since then I just haven’t stopped writing about her, there is so much out there to know and learn and be fascinated and intrigued by.  It has all snowballed.  I do not, by the way, believe that she lived at Rennes-le-Château but at nearby Rennes-les-Bains. 

Oui! These lands and villages hold particular intrigue for me, too. Deep mystery shrouded in tales of Templars, secret treasure, Roman Catholic Church popes and massacres, and the Good Christians, the Cathars. I am pulled to the places the author continuously writes about and researches. Recent inquiries have led me to a particularly harrowing historic event from 1163. More on that tomorrow.

To learn more about the sacred geometry I often reference, I’ve posted a short video from Sir Henry Lincoln, author of many books and investigations. The book you might be most familiar is The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. It is this book that inspired Dan Brown’s The da Vinci Code. And Leonardo da Vinci lands prominently in the Cathar and Templar history. Sir Henry started his research in the ’70’s after finding an obscure little book he bought at a book shop for his French vacation.

This is a tale of the ancient treasures of the Visigoths. The late nineteenth century priest of Rennes-le-Chateau, Berenger Sauniere, supposedly uncovered this secret. According to the book he wants us to follow the clues he built into his domain as a legacy for the future. [Rennes-les-Chateau books]

It changed Sir Henry’s life. And mine.

Sir Henry Lincoln died on February 24th this year. Being back in this region, I think of him so much and wish deeply he was still with us. I have so many questions. He was made an honorary Knights Templar. I remember the day sitting around a table in Rennes-les-Bains when he reverently displayed his treasure.

I miss him. All I keep thinking is, ‘he knows.’

[You can find Sir Henry’s older BBC documentaries on his youtube channel, ‘Henry Speaks.’]

Fascinating find. Had no idea this book existed.

Crux Ansata, subtitled ‘An Indictment of the Roman Catholic Church’ by H.G. Wells, is a 96-page wartime book first published in 1943. Wells lived in London under the regular German Luftwaffe bombings from across the English Channel. He attacks Pope Pius XII and calls for the bombing of the city of Rome. And it’s also a hostile history of the Roman Catholic Church. Apparently Wells was an atheist and had a long history of anti-Catholic writings across many years.


Another spectacularly brilliant capture from the James Webb telescope.

NASA writes:

“A dramatic blade made of red gaseous wisps comes down top-to-bottom in the center of the image as smaller green wisps feather out in horizontal directions. A bright star shrouded in blue light is near the center of the bow-like blade. Blue dots in different sizes dot the background of the image, signifying neighboring stars.”⁣


As Alex spews his hates and lies in a U.S. courtroom, reminded today we can draw a straight line from a moment in history to his deceptions and deep ugliness. Today is the anniversary of Reagan’s repeal of the Fairness Doctrine, the corner stone of my academic writing. Thank you for the reminder, Jon Meacham. It was on August 4th 1987 a decision was made that altered the trajectory of our news and information platforms, and landed the U.S. amidst false prophets, conspiracies, lies and polarization. January 6th doesn’t happen if Reagan left it alone. It’s how we got Rush and the state propaganda known as FOX. (Not news, just FOX.) Think of it like this using the medium of radio as an example. Radio stations no longer had to show both sides of a topic and conservatives quickly outpaced liberals. Cue Newt Gingrich, too, and his ‘Contract with America.’  After that, Rupert Murdoch, Roger Ailes, and the FOX brotherhood. Devastating decision, Ronnie.

Bonne Nuit.

Dayle in Limoux – Day #22

July 27, 2022

T

O

D

A

Y

William Henry Ashfield IV

 

‘Modeling the Effects of Flare Energy Release and Transport Through Chromospheric Condensation and Ultraviolet Coronal Emission.’

 

‘When we grant ourselves permission to live the life we want, there is little in the world that can stop us.’ -Marianne Williamson

Not even a plague. :)

Félicitations Guillaume Henri! Je t’aime.

 

At 5 pm today in France and 9am in Montana, William Henry defends his thesis. After 24 years of organized academics, he has reached the pinnacle. He is 27. He is brilliant. And those who know, knew. His teachers at Blaine County Schools in Sun Valley, Idaho. Reed College in Portland, who gave him the validation he needed, confirming his brilliance when he doubted. And his mom, who knew from the beginning, when I was holding him and he pointed at the dark sky and said, “Moon.” His first word. I am with you every moment, William Henry, my heart lifted to your gifts and possibility, your service and humility. You chose your life brilliantly. The planet, Gaia, needs you! Your Stanford/Lockheed post-doc awaits.

Here you G R O W!

 

“The ability to perceive or think differently is more important than the knowledge gained.”

-Dr. David Bohm

 

“I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.”

-Albert Einstein

Denver ℒℴve.

 

@BlaineSchools
@Reed_College_

Dayle in Limoux – Day #8

July 12, 2022

Si Français.

Annie leaves for the U.S. tomorrow at 3 am through Toulouse, Amsterdam, Salt Lake City, and then Sun Valley. Magical she was here in France the same time as her maman.

Serendipity. Synchronicity. Symmetry. The Universe’s most special gifts to me. Merci merci merci. I will miss you, Annie Glenn.

Another gift from the Universe today, although captured eons ago, we get to gaze upon her magnificence now.

NASA wrote:

Better together. International collaboration gave us the most powerful space telescope ever made, and the deepest infrared views of the universe ever seen. With our partners, together we #UnfoldTheUniverse.

From VOX:

“Think about that: In every pinprick of sky, there are thousands and thousands of galaxies, at least.”

And then, the Universe gives again. The moon in Limoux.

La lune. She’s almost full. And the swallows murmur.

Readying for Bastille Day! As called in France, ‘Fête nationale française,’ and legally le 14 juillet.’ THURSDAY! I should be able to view fireworks from my balcony. Going to immerse myself in the splendor of love for country. It’s been awhile.

“An enormous fortress of prejudices, privileges, superstitions, lies, exactions, abuses, violences, iniquities, and darkness still stands erect in this world, with its towers of hatred. It must be cast down. This monstrous mass must be made to crumble. To conquer at Austerlitz is grand; to take the Bastille is immense.”
Victor Hugo

Collecting maps now. :) The Tour is getting closer to Limoux. Too many dropping because of COVID. Mask up. BA.5 is real…and here. Viva Le Tour!

À bientôt.

❀

“This is not okay.”

February 18, 2022

Written in response to SpaceX/Tesla founder Elon Musks comparison to Hilter and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on social media yesterday. [The meme will not be posted here. -dayle] 

From from author and former CBS news anchor Dan Rather:

“To see this face [Hitler] staring back at us, with a message like this, is absolutely beyond the pale of any civilized communication. I think of the millions dead. I think of a world destroyed. I shake with anger. The pit of my stomach is sick. I am deeply saddened.”

From his blog, Steady:

“On the individual level this raises serious concerns about Musk, whose public pronouncements have become increasingly strident and aligned with fringe political actors. Meanwhile, his company Tesla is being sued in California for racism.

The opprobrium Musk is getting is well warranted. His behavior raises many questions. Will it hurt the popularity of his Tesla cars? What will it mean for his SpaceX company’s contracts with NASA? Or, will anyone really care? Is this all just normal now, within the spectrum of what is considered “acceptable”?

I am confident that the vast majority of Americans and people around the globe find this rhetoric reprehensible. Just because you are a feted centibillionaire (a new word for those in the $100 billion club) doesn’t mean you can get away with this outrageousness. When people rise up and say, “No,” “This is not okay,” “We will not let it stand unchallenged,” the world has no choice but to pay attention. There can be swelling choruses for good. Public pressure can lead to better outcomes.”

Musk eventually deleted the meme later in the day.

Full essay:

https://steady.substack.com/p/this-is-not-okay?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email&utm_content=share&token=eyJ1c2VyX2lkIjo3NzQxODc2LCJfIjoiNWFQOEkiLCJpYXQiOjE2NDUyMDk3NzIsImV4cCI6MTY0NTIxMzM3MiwiaXNzIjoicHViLTI0Nzg4MSIsInN1YiI6InBvc3QtcmVhY3Rpb24ifQ.6zL6Ab_NsNL0d2M7qHAWXkVNbBtpZyWJHAEVkSMQYNQ


“Is this all just normal now, within the spectrum of what is considered ‘acceptable’?”

-Dan Rather

dayle: Thinking of this in context of seeing a clip of a photographer fall off a six-foot stage in LA while capturing a photo of the Rams quarterback and his wife at a victory celebration. The quarterback saw it and turned his back, not offering to help or ask for assistance.

https://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2022/02/18/matthew-stafford-los-angeles-rams-photographer-falls-super-bowl-jk-orig.cnn

Considered in larger context, how is the vitriol, hate, anger, and neglect centered in social media affecting our sense of collective compassion and kindness? Is being called out for turning his back the reason the couple is offering to pay the photographer’s medical bills? As documentarian Ken Burns shared in an interview with variety this week about his concerns for the U.S., 

“My whole question to America is where do you want to live?” says Burns. “This is a simple choice between Bedford Falls and Pottersville. Do you wish to be a community in which everyone is bound to each other and enjoys the blessings of liberty and free speech and freedom to assemble and religion? Or do you wish to live in an I’ll-get-mine Pottersville, in which everything is degraded and corrupted.”

Full interview:

https://variety.com/2022/film/features/ken-burns-documentaries-benjamin-franklin-donald-trump-pbs-1235182021/?scrolltoken=xj1BjIE2L-tqn0ADKHu5VhYzoEFvpfS51NOaW52hz-RspwapwPNfuKGLLw29plwVDWuwaq59o34k1r1MvjvM1n1qw1drp8uO2dRXN8b08IzZCQcWCkE_sBMpLMKIhptTpgJ5Cl8EccFjFsGpO9xeqRZxcn3_dkB1n0Y4apcNHK0GCP8NGhP0p-eZAz7EnbYAb5FdE4rZMSwSx3u-iIjJlonR.eyJraWQiOiIzIn0

Moon Trees 🌕

February 2, 2022

We Almost Forgot About the Moon Trees

A collection of tree seeds that went round and round the moon was scattered far and wide back home.

By Marina Koren

Apollo 14—the third of six moon landings—is known, as I recently discovered, for its “moon trees.”

Stuart Roosa, one of the Apollo 14 astronauts, took a small canvas bag of tree seeds with him on the journey. While his fellow astronauts walked on the lunar surface, Roosa and the seeds flew round and round the moon until the crew was ready to come back. A few years after the astronauts returned home, some of the seeds—sycamores, redwoods, pines, firs, and sweetgums—were planted across the United States, to see how they would grow, or simply to keep a piece of moon history close by.

That I could find a database of these trees, and go through the experience of identifying and losing the moon tree nearest me in five seconds, is because of Dave Williams, a planetary scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, who 25 years ago took it upon himself to locate as many of them as he could. NASA didn’t keep any records on where the seeds from Apollo 14 ended up, nor did the agency keep up with the trees they became. But Williams does, even though it’s not part of his job description. He is not a tree expert, but he has become, through his efforts, the world’s foremost—and perhaps only—expert on moon trees.

(It was) discovered that the head of the U.S. Forest Service had pitched Roosa, a former smoke jumper who fought forest fires, on the idea. The astronaut took about 500 seeds stuffed in sealed bags inside a metal canister, packed in the small canvas bag that every Apollo astronaut was allowed to fill with whatever they wanted. When the astronauts came back, the sealed bags went through a vacuum chamber—part of the standard decontamination protocol at the time—and accidentally burst, scattering the seeds. Stan Krugman, a geneticist at the forest service, sorted them by hand, then passed them on to a scientist who used some to experiment with germination at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, in Houston. The rest were sent to forestry-science facilities, which doled them out to communities across the country, grateful for a free piece of the Apollo era to spice up their municipal grounds.

The trees, planted mostly in 1976, took root just fine on Earth. Some of the moon seeds were planted next to seeds that had never traveled to space, to see whether they’d develop any differently. The most surprising result, Williams told me, occurred when the two seeds grew into two completely different species—a result of a gardening mixup, of course, not the weird effects of microgravity. NASA didn’t undertake any serious study of the moon trees. The effort was more a PR move, Williams said, than a science experiment.

All the trinkets and tchotchkes that the Apollo astronauts took with them in their personal canvas bags are cool for this reason, bestowed with a magical sheen the second they were returned to Earth—space souvenirs. But the seeds that Roosa, who died in 1994, carried feel different from other mementos. They weren’t put in museums or auctioned off. They were buried in the soil of the Earth, the only soil like it in the solar system—in the entire universe, as far as we know. Some might have disappeared, felled by storms or saws, before someone could find them and feel curious enough to ask NASA about them. But the ones that remain are living monuments to the time humankind escaped this world’s gravity and felt that of another.’

From nasa.gov:

Image from the Moon Tree Planting event on Feb. 8, 2021 at the Texas A&M AgriLife Center. (Laura McKenzie/Texas A&M AgriLife Marketing & Communications)

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2022/01/nasa-moon-trees-apollo/621395/?utm_source=twitter&utm_term=2022-02-01T02%253A42%253A34&utm_content=edit-promo&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=the-atlantic&scrollnorefresh=1

NASA

December 27, 2020

“Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of the Christmas Tree Cluster. Infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center and appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals that resemble a snowflake’s pattern.”

Sally Ride & the ‘Lazy Media’

June 18, 2019

The only bad moments in our training involved the press… Whereas NASA appeared to be very enlightened about flying women astronauts, the press didn’t appear to be. The things that they were concerned with were not the same things that I was concerned with… Everybody wanted to know what kind of makeup I was taking up — they didn’t care about how well-prepared I was to operate the arm or deploy communication satellites… The worst question that I’ve gotten was whether I cried when we got malfunctions in the simulator. -Sally Ride

Maria Popova:

“In 1978, while studying for her Ph.D. in physics, Sally Ride (May 26, 1951–July 23, 2012) answered a newspaper ad from NASA. On June 18, 1983, she soared into the cosmos aboard the Space Shuttle Challengerand became the first American woman in space, the country’s youngest astronaut in orbit, and the world’s first lesbian astronaut to launch into the cosmos. “We’ve come a long way,” she declared.

But lurking in the shadow of every major leap toward equality is also a reminder of how far we have yet to go. Shortly after returning to Earth from orbit, Ride sat down with trailblazing feminist Gloria Steinem — a woman who has dedicated her life to the art of public listening — for a conversation about gender in science, how the options our culture makes available to us limit the dreams we’re capable of dreaming, how lazy journalism perpetuates stereotypes, and the future of space exploration.”

brain pickings.org

 

Perseid Meteor Shower 2018 ☆

July 24, 2018

‘According to NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke, the Perseids are perhaps the most popular meteor shower of the year; and this year, they’ll be the best shower of the year. This year during peak people should see about 60-70 meteors per hour, but in outburst years (such as in 2016) the rate can be between 150-200 meteors an hour. The meteor shower’s peak will be visible both the nights of Aug. 11-12 and Aug. 12-13, Cooke said, but he’s inclined this year to lean toward the night of Aug. 12-13 for the better show. (Both, however, should be spectacular.)”This year the moon will be near new moon, it will be a crescent, which means it will set before the Perseid show gets underway after midnight,” Cooke told Space.com. “The moon is very favorable for the Perseids this year, and that’ll make the Perseids probably the best shower of 2018 for people who want to go out and view it.” The Perseids are rich in fireballs, so the show should be even better.’

The 5%.

March 31, 2018

“Your friendly reminder that dark matter comprises 25 percent of the mass energy budget of the cosmos, while dark energy comprise 70 percent, and the normal matter that you and I are made of is just a wee 5 percent. And it’s all connected by a cosmic web of filamentary bridges that stretch across millions of lightyears. Carry on.”

Natalie Batalha, NASA Astrophysicist

 

 

Clean Web Design