Dayle in Limoux – Day #35

August 9, 2022

Mary Magdalene from the Rennes-les-Chateau museum, once Abbot Bérenger Saunière’s living quarters.

We are all part of the cruelty of the world. Even when we think we know nothing about it. We all carry a Hitler and a Yeshua in us [dualism]. At one time or another each person must stop and face their own failures and cruelties. Otherwise, they are just projected on. 

It has to stop where f o r g i v e n e s s starts. 

We all take park in the cruelties.

-The Manuscript [2008], by Lars Muhl

A trilogy, The Seer, The Magdalene, The Grail

‘We are gravity and grace.’

Amnesty International reporting false information (gravity) from Ukraine, other journalists respond bewildered who know what they reported is wrong; it has given credence to Russia’s never-ending war propaganda. I am ending my support of Amnesty because of what they’ve done; it was reckless and dangerous.

And reading the reporting and feedback in the U.S. after the FBI executes a search warrant at Maralago is almost humorous, if not so sad. Treating the one-time, twice impeached former president as some sort of deity beyond reproach, or the law, is absurd. The world is watching. The U.S. is a sad, sad joke.

‘It’s a war between those who create culture and those who destroy it, those who live a full human life and those who live in hatred, a war between the human and the inhuman.’

-Bruno Maçães

Bruno Maçães is a Portuguese politician, consultant and author.  His book, History has Begun (2020), is excellent.

Being awake while the U.S. sleeps is profound really; the world seems at peace.

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We can’t get a break here in France, the U.K., many parts of Europe, as so many are experiencing across the planet. And severe droughts. Fires. We might get a bit of reprieve next week…in the 80’s. Until then, extreme heat again tomorrow and through Saturday at least.

Tellement français! {So French!} 🌼

In this heat, everything dries so quickly. There is very little air conditioning in France. People learn how to live with the heat. That’s why we see so many shutters on buildings…it’s for the weather, to keep their homes cool in the summer, warm in the winter. They’re energy conscious, too. Clotheslines, not dryers. Long mid-day breaks when the heat is strongest, and the sun, too. The pace is so much slower. And kinder. (And the cars so much smaller.)

Some tips from NPR readers on how they stay cool without A/C:

1. Spray water

2. Sleep in a wet sheet

3. Sleep outdoors

4. Deflect the sun

5. Eat cold food

6. Lay on a tile floor

7. Spray cologne

8. Catch a movie

9. Do laundry by hand (I do!)

10. Box fans

11. Freeze water bottles

Covid, Monkeypox, Climate Breakdown. Summer of Fun! Ooh, la la. 🌞

And, Heading for the second full moon (!) in France while the sun is in Leo, the ‘Lion’s Gate.’ La Lune.

Also known as the Sturgeon moon, this is the final super moon of the year. This big energy can help you to honor a bid for power with gratitude for what is fueling your new steps forward. That fuel is made up of all the lessons you have learned, the choices you have made, and all that you have accomplished and experienced in your life. The gratitude is for the abundance you have manifested in all areas. Take this gratitude and use it to feed your courage and determination.

Be as practical as you can with your choices and decisions moving forward and consider others as you plan ahead. This moon is relationship-oriented so stay out of conflict and move towards supportive, cooperative companionship instead. It is always a good idea to spend time in nature and contemplation in order to connect deeply with yourself and your true intentions. -Power Path

[Full Moon is Thursday, August 11th.]

Bonne nuit.

🌖

Dayle in Limoux – Day #34

August 8, 2022

Another 37 C day in Limoux! 98 Fahrenheit. The heat is cumulative and defeating. Makes it difficult for hiking and exploring…depleting. Some days it feels as though there just isn’t enough 

Thoughts…

Bored male leaders massaging their EGO’s and need for greed contemplating annihilation for the win.

Euronews

‘UN Chief Antonio Guterres has called for the end of military operation around Europe’s largest nuclear plant, hit with a series of bombardments since last Friday, with both Russian and Ukrainian forces blaming one another for the attacks. “Any attack on nuclear power plants is a suicidal thing,” the UN’s secretary-general told reporters in Tokyo. “I hope that the IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] will be able to access the power plant.” Nuclear risks to humanity are only “a misunderstanindng” way from nuclear annihilation.’

History is an endless argument.

And.

Tipping points go both ways.

From Marianne Williamson,

‘May my eyes be open, that I might see more beauty; may my ears be open, that I might hear more truth; may my spirit be open that I might feel the tender touch of [Gaia].’

~

There are two paths you can go by, but in the long run, there’s still time to change the road you’re on, and it makes me wonder.’

-Lez Zeppelin

The 7th Generation Principle is based on an ancient Iroquois philosophy that the decisions we make today should result in a sustainable world seven generations into the future.

‘Oxford philosopher William MacAskill offers one such outlook, zooming out on the timeline of human civilization to put this moment into context. The story of humanity, Oxford philosopher William MacAskill argues, is just beginning. In fact, if history were a novel, we’d still be in the prologue. 

This is encouraging. It means that we have both the power and the responsibility to aim the trajectory of civilization in a positive direction, the idea that positively influencing the long-term future is a key moral priority of our time.’

-Cornelia Channing, Editorial Assistant, NYTimes Sunday Opinion

“Here in Japan, paper cranes symbolize the hope for a future without nuclear weapons. There is only one solution to the nuclear threat: not to have nuclear weapons at all.”

-António Guterres, Security-General of the U.N. 

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Let’s make more paper cranes, and use old telephones, and refrigerate without Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), compounds released into the atmosphere since the 1930s through air-conditioning, refrigeration, blowing agents in foams, insulations and packing materials, propellants in aerosol cans, and as solvents.

‘How to Relive the Pleasures of a Landline’

OUI!

Art work from Getty.

From The New Yorker’s Rachel Syme.

“If you call me and I am at home, chances are you are going to reach me on an actual, old-fashioned, dial-’em-up telephone. The one that currently sits on my desk is a putty-colored rotary model circa the nineteen-sixties, with a weighted handset and a long, sproingy, yellowing cord that scrunches pleasantly between the fingers like al dente fusilli. I purchased this particular phone last fall, on eBay, for $19.99. You can find far pricier vintage telephones on that site, of course—retro phones in Instagram-friendly colors such as avocado green and Barbie pink.”

Barbie.

“It makes me feel glamorous and put together to grab my vintage receiver, even if I am still in my pajamas.”

C’est possible!

Most of what we encounter is driven by emotions, and our emotions are always relative. When we’re shopping for a car or an avocado, we’re buying the way it makes us feel, not how it would make someone else feel. -Seth Godin

Emotion, perhaps why grace and forgiveness, although the Universe’s natural default, or so difficult for humans to feel, and choose.

Dualism…non-dualism. Reading and researching on the tenets of the Cathar philosophy, their way of living and belief, versus, the Nicene Council Christianity begat in the 4th century anno domini by then Roman Emperor Constantine.

Fr Richard Rohr, whom I adore, gets in the weeds, I think when he promotes non-dualism in religion.

“The body is rightly reasserting its goodness and importance. Can we somehow honor both body and spirit together? When Christianity is in any way anti-body, it is not authentic (?) Christianity. The incarnation tells us that body and spirit must fully operate and be respected as one.”

He then tries to forward his argument with behavioral psychology.

“Many Christians falsely assumed that if they could “die” to their body, their spirit would for some reason miraculously arise. Often the opposite was the case. After centuries of body rejection, and the lack of any positive body theology, the West is now trapped in substance addiction, obesity, anorexia, bulimia, plastic surgery, and an obsession with appearance and preserving these bodies. Our poor bodies, which Jesus affirmed, have become the receptacles of so much negativity and obsession.”

Juxtapose this with the Cathar belief, and the reason they were massacred, often burned at the stake, by the hundreds of thousands, most likely a million murdered. The writing offered by Nick Lambert, from the book, ‘The Cathar View.’

“The eternal battle of good and evil deities is at the centre of the Cathar worldview and although this belief came in a variety of forms, they were very similar to the dualistic faiths were specifically prohibited by orthodox Christianity (Constantine): the Gnostics, the Manichaeans, the Paulicians and the Bogomils of the Balkans. It is upon the issue of dualism that much of the excitement and controversy around the Cathars rests. Absolute dualism is the position adopted in the Book of Two Principles:

‘The good God is not the creator of the base and tangible elements of this world; another creator is responsible for them. God is alright but not in the sense that He can create evil; what He does not desire He cannot do. He is omnipotent over all good things, but there must be another creator form whom all evils flow, who in no way derives from the good God. The evil one is eternal, as are his works.’

The key word being ‘works.’ Works, in humanity, through the body, choices and behaviors, are from the material world, and the material world is the ‘body.’ Pretty sure when the body dies, the body and soul are separated. Otherwise, yikes. Christians, beginning in the 4th century, start dancing around this and never stop. For the Cathars, it wasn’t that confusing. And most were absolute.

More.

“The dualist explanation of good and evil gods was less equivocal than this compromise, and the spread of the Cathars show how compelling it for many people. It was silly more consistent, given the state of the world, to attribute equal powers to the contending gods. Another factor was the ‘jealous god’ of Moses and the Israelites, and the peaceful philosophy of Jesus and his Apostles. […] Strong echoes of this cosmology are found centuries later in William Blake’s radical interpretations of the Bible, (like the) Old Testament’s Jehovah, and Blake cast him as an implacable figure, conveying something of his antithetical and flawed creative powers as the Cathars one saw them.”

“Dualism, then, was the fulcrum about which the rest of Cathar beliefs turned, informing their eschatology (they did not, it seems, subscribe to an apocalyptic Day of Judgment because they did not believe in the resurrection of the body). This belief in reincarnation likely derived from Neo-platonism and the ancient Greek philosophy of metempsychosis. The transmigration of souls was specifically opposed in Christianity but became a central tenet of Catharsis, and the ascension that they aimed for was a liberation from the constant cycle of death and rebirth, rather similar to Buddhist beliefs. and Manichaeism.”

Dualism, the reason Bérenger Saunière included the ruler of earthly evil, Rex Mundi, in his church dedicated to Mary Magdalene after he made his parchment discoveries hidden away for centuries on the grounds of Rennes-les-Chateau.

[Rex Mundi now behind protective plexiglass because someone tried to destroy it once. If you don’t agree, then annihilate. Your thoughts, Pope (not so) Innocent III.]


When you V O T E  in the U.S. midterms, remember these faces and names. These are the senators, men, who cow-tailed to their dark money lobbyists. This is who they show allegiance, not their constituents, who are in need and in diabetic health crisis.

‘The past is past; nothing can change it. But the future depends on the present; we still have the opportunity to shape it. This is not a matter of employing technology or spending more money, it’s a question of developing a sense of concern for others’ well-being.’

-Dalai Lama

8.8.22

Dayle in Limoux – Day #33

August 7, 2022

To be a projection of higher value. As I begin this day, I am open to receive. May my mind stay open and may I not deviate from things that are pure (Cathar) and true. Beyond the illusions of this worldly plane. I surrender to you my doings this day. 

From Fr Richard Rohr, The Center for Action & Contemplation

‘In his book Coming to Our Senses, historian Morris Berman makes the point that our first experience of being alive is not through the visual or auditory experience of knowing ourselves through other people’s responses; it is primarily felt in the body. He calls this kinesthetic knowing. We know ourselves in the security of those who hold us, skin to skin. This early encounter is not so much heard, seen, or thought. It’s felt. That’s the original knowing.

Hopefully, our caregivers’ early gaze told us we were foundationally beloved. But when we inevitably begin to see ourselves through eyes that compare, judge, and dismiss, then we need spirituality to help heal the brokenness of our identity and our world.

It parts the veil and tells us that our primal experience was trustworthy. It tells us that we are beloved, whether we received that mirroring gaze or not. It reassures us that we live in a benevolent universe, and it is on our side.

The universe, it assures us, is radical grace.’

︶⁀°• •° ⁀︶

How do you dream?

‘In Bhutan, they dream of rainbows.

In countries throughout the world, even in countries where there are no snakes, the most common dream is one based on our (it must be) genetic fear of snakes.

But in Bhutan, they dream of rainbows.

The dreams might be consistent, but the way we talk about them clearly isn’t. Perhaps the dreams we remember and talk about have something to do with culture.

Conversations are contagious.’

-Seth Godin

︶⁀°• •° ⁀︶

‘It is fashionable to be pessimistic about humankind — look at the assorted messes we’ve got ourselves into, and the undoubted evil that pervades the whole earth: war, poverty, child abuse, slavery, drugs, corruption of various sorts, racism and sexism, bigotry, hypocrisy — the list is depressingly long. Finding it impossible to comprehend that a good God would be concerned with such a hell, the Gnostic developed the idea that there were two Gods, the evil one who ruled the Earth, and the good God who lived in Heaven. Undoubtedly almost every individual who has ever lived has had some experience of this life as living hell, but without necessarily adding to it him, or herself.

[…]

Free of priests, gurus and dogma, the progress of our spirit is, perhaps terrifyingly, nothing more or less than our own responsibility.’ [Shades of Emerson.]

-Lynn Picknett, ‘Mary Magdalene’

‘The imaginal realm is real, and through it you will never be separated from anyone or anything you have ever loved, for love is the ground in which you live and move and have your being. This is the message that Mary Magdlane has perennials to bring. This is the message we most need to hear.’

[…]

‘It is clear that Mary Magdalene knew a good deal about that realm. At that spiritual tipping point where “no longer the object of my affection, he has become the subject of my truth,” a new energy emerges: pure (Cathar) creativity and effortless action. This is the “spiritual procreativity” described by both the Gospel of Philip and the poet Rilke.’

-Cynthia Bourgeault

‘The Cathars left behind no magnificent church architecture, for they believed that the essence of Christ’s teaching was humility and an indifference to material possessions. The temple of God lay within us for He was approached through the heart.’

-Margaret Long, author

︶⁀°• •° ⁀︶

Went to a wonderful concert tonight for the community at Saint-Martin’s. The organist and the alto soprano were beautifully in tandem. And the acoustics! Those 12th century builders…they knew. :)

At one point in history, Saint-Martin’s was actually a cathedral. In 1316, after the Albigensian Crusade, Pope John XXII created a small diocese, centered here in Limoux.

╰ღ╮╭ღ╯


Reading in France tonight about the U.S. Senate vote today:

Senate Democrats pass $740 billion tax, climate and health care bill. [Axios]

Jeff Stein, White House economics reporter for The Washington Post, writing:

Biggest-ever climate bill: Massive industry clean energy money; $80B for EVs, heat pumps, home solar installation

Up to $7,500 to buy an EV — Up to $2K for heat pump — 30% off home rooftop solar — $840 for electric cooktop — Up to $9K for electric panel/home insulation

The planet continues to burn, and climate breakdown is painfully and frighteningly  real.

From VOX:

The Senate just passed one of the biggest bills to fight climate change, ever.
What’s in the “game changer” climate bill nobody saw coming.
by, Rebecca Leber

Aug 7, 2022

David Goldman/AP

‘After nearly 18 months of haggling and 15-straight hours of weekend votes, Senate Democrats passed the Inflation Reduction Act on a strict party-line vote on Sunday.

The bill contains $369 billion in funding for clean energy and electric vehicle tax breaks, domestic manufacturing of batteries and solar panels, and pollution reduction. It is the single most important step the US has ever taken to combat the climate crisis. And arguably, it’s one of the single biggest investments ever made on climate in the world.

If the bill’s policies work as intended, it would push American consumers and industry away from reliance on fossil fuels, penalize fossil fuel companies for excess emissions of methane, and inject needed funds into pollution cleanup.

The bill uses tax credits to incentivize consumers to buy electric cars, electric HVAC systems, and other forms of cleaner technology, leading to less emissions from cars and electricity generation, and includes incentives for companies to manufacture that technology in the United States. It also includes money for a host of other climate priorities, like investing in forest and coastal restoration and in resilient agriculture.

These investments, spread out over the next decade, are likely to cut pollution by around 40 percent below 2005 levels by 2030, according to three separate analyses by economic modelers at Rhodium Group, Energy Innovation, and Princeton University. The legislation helps move the US a little closer to its stated goal of cutting pollution in half within the decade.’

[Full piece]

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2022/7/28/23281757/whats-in-climate-bill-inflation-reduction-act

And we can all do our part to contribute to the shift to save and heal our Gaia. We must.

YES! Magazine

“Earth repair is a participatory sport: a grassroots response to evolving global crises.”

While mainstream environmentalism has historically pursued either preservation or conservation, Schwartz’s new book, The Reindeer Chronicles (Chelsea Green 2020) explores a third option: regeneration.

She looks at community efforts to restore ecosystems the world over. “We’ve been trained to believe that finding solutions is a job for the experts,” she writes, but “Earth repair is a participatory sport: a grassroots response to evolving global crises.”

We may not know what the future climate is going to look like, and she acknowledges that not knowing is really hard. “But we’ve got to try,” she says matter of factly. “We’re here now … Just start.”

“There is no natural law that says profit must supersede other types of reward,” she writes. “The truth is, we are what we measure—or at least our actions are largely determined by how we gauge success. What if environmental healing, social engagement, and a commitment to the future governed our companies and institutions, and therefore our work lives?”

“We’ve all got places,” she says. “Places have their own ecological logic. Let’s do what we can where we are and learn from each other.” That idea of connecting with place and community is central to her worldview. “The ‘we’ who can address climate change is everybody,” she says.

“There is no one size fits all for climate action.” Schwartz says we need to protest oil companies and make art and grow healthy food and feed one another and, in her case, write—all using our respective skills to imagine a more resilient world.’

#

The Guardian

Photograph: SbytovaMN/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Clever use of water in the garden saves untold time and effort
You’d be amazed at how much time some gardeners spend watering

  1. Plant in the ground, not pots
  2. Use Mulch
  3. Water in the cool of the evening

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2022/aug/07/james-wong-on-gardening-clever-use-of-water-saves-time-and-effort?utm_term=Autofeed&CMP=twt_gu&utm_medium&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1659858077

“At first there’s no path…and then someone bravely makes a step, and others join…just start.”

-Jacqueline Novogratz

🌏 ℒℴve

À bientôt.

Dayle in Limoux – Day #32

August 6, 2022

BBC

‘The Notre-Dame Cathedral is on track to open its doors to worshippers and the public in 2024, says France’s culture minister.

The 13th Century Paris monument caught fire in April 2019, sparking a vast outpouring of emotion.

Since then, a huge restoration project has been carried out aiming to restore it to its previous design.’

Wonderful news! In time, too, for the Summer Olympics in Paris.

UN

Today, remembering the anniversary of Hiroshima, particularly poignant after the startling reminder from the UN chief that humanity is ‘one miscalculation away from nuclear annihilation.’

“It is totally unacceptable for states in possession of nuclear weapons to admit the possibility of a nuclear war,” António Guterres underscored early on Saturday in Japan at a ceremony marking the 77th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

Land grabs, borders, and bored male leaders who are pained by their quest for power and greed and violence.

From Dorothy Day:

“Mr, Truman was jubilant. President Truman. True man; what a strange name, come to think of it. We refer to Jesus Christ as true God and true Man. Truman is a true man of his time in that he was jubilant. He was not a son of God, brother of Christ, brother of the Japanese, jubilating as he did. He went from table to table on the cruiser which was bringing him home from the Big Three conference, telling the great news; “jubilant” the newspapers said. Jubilate Deo. We have killed 318,000 Japanese.”

—Dorothy Day, editorial following Hiroshima bomb [Posted on social media by Robert Ellsberg, Orbis Books]

‘God is that which promotes life, evil is that which destroys it.’

-Albert Schweitzer [1875-1965]

‘Now I have become death, the destroyer of worlds.’ –Bhagavad Gita

D I V I N E   F E M I N I N E 🥀

‘There is no day on which I grow not

Finer and more pure,

For this world holds no nobler lady

Than she whom I do serve and I adore.

And these – the words I speak –

Come singing from an open heart.’

-Troubadour Arnaut Daniel, 1180-1200

(Translation by Henry Lincoln.]

‘Throughout history, the quest for beauty, loe and truth has struggled to survive amid the quest for dominance and greed. During the medieval era, the dominant powers of church and state burned the last Templars. They burned thousands of Cathars, and they burned Joan of Arc, who tried to liberate her people from foreign rule. They even tried to ban the poetry and songs of the troubadours. But the spirit of truth would not be silenced and rose again and again, from the dust and ashes, rising from the half remembered promise patterned in the blood, held in the heart. Always they return, with the flame of hope for a better world filled with compassion, beauty and a song of love returning to the land […] a new earth and return to Beauty.’

-Ani Williams, harpist and singer, who has recorded more than two dozen albums of original sacred music based on ancient spiritual traditions.

Bonne nuit.

🌙

Dayle in Limoux — Day #31

August 5, 2022

Marche

Esperaza

Mary’s Grotto

Dinosaurs

Rennes-les-Chateau

Visigoths

Books

Lepidolite

1163

:)

It’s been a day!

On this day, August 5th, in 1163, four Cathar men and a girl were burned for refusing to ‘repent’ after it was discovered they were living in a barn in Cologne and had not gone to church that Sunday. They were called out for heresy and would not deny their Cathar, or Good Christian, faith. So they were thrown into the fire. The story goes that some of the villagers were holding the girl back, trying to protect her, but she would not leave her Cathar brethren. She tore herself away from them and threw her body onto the pyre.

Burnings, you may be surprised to learn, had been very uncommon up to that point, and in the past had sometimes taken place at the request of noblemen for potlical, rather than religious reasons. After 1163, everything changed.

I’ll update soon! My phone went completely dead and it’s taking forever to charge, so I can’t grab my photos. I’ll be back…

(Did you know the first dinosaur eggs to be found anywhere on the planet were discovered in this region of Southern France? One of the many discoveries today.)

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Well, an update to the update. I just lost all of my edits…photos…text…two hours just 💨. Poof. Gone. Trying to recover, no luck. Not sure I have the energy to do this all again.

I think, without trying to re-create all my writing, I’ll post photos and give you an idea of the day’s exploration. My phone wouldn’t re-charge, tried outlets and cleaning portals…nothing. Knew I needed a new chord…travel with two or three! I only brought one. So I set out on a reconnaissance mission for a virtual life-line and with the help of a new acquaintance found the store without a sign or a street name. New chord, a charged iPhone, and now access to photos!

“And now that you don’t have to be perfect, you can be good.”

—John Steinbeck, East of Eden

 I’m finding myself drawn to mess, to darkness, to things that are loved to the point of shabbiness, or just wildly imperfect in their own gorgeous way. 

Present is living with your feet firmly grounded in reality, pale and uncertain as it may seem. Present is choosing to believe that your own life is worth investing deeply in, instead of waiting for some rare miracle or fairy tale. Present means we understand that the here and now is sacred, sacramental, threaded through with divinity even in its plainness. Especially in its plainness.

—Shauna Niequist

Wildly imperfect. My new mantra.

The day started at Saint Martin’s for some time with Mary Magdalene.

Then the marche with wildly imperfect sites and sounds and aromas and people. The Friday markets are the best…blocks of vendors and local foods. Although I reject fish and seafood as nourishment, I had to capture a photo of this sweet man’s Paella. He was so proud to share his creation. It looked amazing!

Found some more incense and then it was time to head for the bus with my €1…public transportation here is the best…and journey to Esperaza. There’s a church there I really wanted to see, dedicated to Mary Magdalene.

I was dropped at the stop and started walking. Finally found the city center, or place [pronounced ‘ploss’] in this sweet little village.

And then, the church!

So much history. I tried to open the door. Locked. Shoot. So I walked around the church and starting taking pictures…

When I walked back around I saw a woman who looked like she just left. What the heck. Tried the door. Still locked. But! The door next to it that looked like a storage closet was open! I was in. As my eyes started to adjust, that’s when I saw it. Mary Magdalene’s grotto. What. My Gaia. So so beautiful.

Mary is revered in Languedoc. For good reason. Will share more later. The history of the church in Esperaza is that it was built in the 1200’s, and one of the old pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela passesd this way, through the mountains and on into Spain. The town lies in the very heart of Cathar country and intersects the sacred geometry in the region. I spent awhile inside.

The flooring! A want for my future French home.

☆☆•*¨*•.¸¸

☆☆¸.•*¨*•☆☆•*¨*•.¸¸☆☆

Then it was time to find a taxi and head back to the sacred space of Rennes-les-Chateau.

But.

No Taxi.

But.

Found a dinosaur museum!

In this sweet tiny village a dinosaur museum. Pourquoi pas? I mean, who knew the first dinosaur eggs on the P L A N E T were found in this region in Southern France? Crazy.

And this region at one time was more hot and humid than now…tropical, actually. Climate only a dinosaur could love. Also learned that the Ginkgo Biloba trees have been evolving for some 290 million years.

When I went back outside to remove my mask and breathe a bit, somebody sent in this pre-historic bug.

‘To the eternal happiness of all species.’

Found a new number for a taxi service and with the help from the attendants at the museum desk, went out to the road and wait.

Had about a 30 minute wait, so grabbed some Perrier and nuts out of my backpack, grateful for the shade of a beautiful village tree. And a sign. A sign that reminded me it’s my day. :)

Perrier, Blanquette de Limoux, and crème brûlée in the Jardin de Marie at Rennes-les-Chateau. For my birthday! Yep. I celebrated a birthday while in France. 

Joyeux anniversaire à moi!

Look closely and you’ll spot another ancient chateau. My heck. They’re everywhere here! The vibrations from Gaia pulsating with history and mystery.

I was able to join a special meditation located in the ancient Visigoth structures, from about 500 CE.

We had live music accompaniment, too. Beautiful. And transcendent. Talk about vibrations…

Then back to Mary Magdalene’s church.

‘She rests at last beneath the starry skies.’

There it is. Mary’s rose cross. l o v e. 🌸

Then it was back to the book store for more books. The young book shop clerk there is so kind and helpful. His name is Adrian. Wonderful softly-spoken sense of humor. It would be so fun to hang with the workers there, discover their stories and lives. I made a discovery through the books I purchased…more music dedicated to the Magdala. Quite lovely. From Ani Williams. Prolific catalogue of music.

Then it was time to call for a taxi and leave the Chateau.

Back in Limoux I had my new books and found a nice little table at the Grand Cafe there on the square, the Place du la Republique, with one of my favorite servers and had myself a yummy little birthday dinner.

Thanks to Hulu, DePauw University, my dentist in Coronado, a pharmacy on the San Juan Islands, and Delta Airlines for all of the birthday messages. :)

August 5, 1163. Will always remember now the young girl in Cologne. The day she was violenty forced to leave the earth, on the date I was welcomed in. jai

À bientôt.

🎈

Dayle in Limoux – Day #30

August 4, 2022

As I prepare my next exploration, I found a great website in my research today written by Val Wineyard. https://marymagdalenebooks.blog4ever.com She lives in the Languedoc region and studies the history of all things Occitanie, including the Visigoths. She writes,

My previous life was of Visigothic descent.  I decided to find out more about the Visigoths here in our region of Languedoc, the old Visigothic kingdom of Septimanie.  I was so fascinated by this I wrote a book called ‘The Visigothic Inheritance’ and am now working on another, ‘Barbarian Gold.’  Recently I started a blog all about the Visigoths, these little known and badly judged people.  

I had long been interested in Rennes-le-Château, deep in the hills to the south of Carcassonne, because it was founded by the Visigoths.  As a mysterious centre it is endless – one mystery leads onto another;  especially when you enter the church and see for yourself how the unusual priest loved Mary Magdalene.  The whole village is devoted to her.

My conviction that the priest of Rennes-le-Chateau knew something that we didn’t about Mary Magdalene inspired me to write ‘Mary, Jesus and the Charismatic Priest’ and since then I just haven’t stopped writing about her, there is so much out there to know and learn and be fascinated and intrigued by.  It has all snowballed.  I do not, by the way, believe that she lived at Rennes-le-Château but at nearby Rennes-les-Bains. 

Oui! These lands and villages hold particular intrigue for me, too. Deep mystery shrouded in tales of Templars, secret treasure, Roman Catholic Church popes and massacres, and the Good Christians, the Cathars. I am pulled to the places the author continuously writes about and researches. Recent inquiries have led me to a particularly harrowing historic event from 1163. More on that tomorrow.

To learn more about the sacred geometry I often reference, I’ve posted a short video from Sir Henry Lincoln, author of many books and investigations. The book you might be most familiar is The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. It is this book that inspired Dan Brown’s The da Vinci Code. And Leonardo da Vinci lands prominently in the Cathar and Templar history. Sir Henry started his research in the ’70’s after finding an obscure little book he bought at a book shop for his French vacation.

This is a tale of the ancient treasures of the Visigoths. The late nineteenth century priest of Rennes-le-Chateau, Berenger Sauniere, supposedly uncovered this secret. According to the book he wants us to follow the clues he built into his domain as a legacy for the future. [Rennes-les-Chateau books]

It changed Sir Henry’s life. And mine.

Sir Henry Lincoln died on February 24th this year. Being back in this region, I think of him so much and wish deeply he was still with us. I have so many questions. He was made an honorary Knights Templar. I remember the day sitting around a table in Rennes-les-Bains when he reverently displayed his treasure.

I miss him. All I keep thinking is, ‘he knows.’

[You can find Sir Henry’s older BBC documentaries on his youtube channel, ‘Henry Speaks.’]

Fascinating find. Had no idea this book existed.

Crux Ansata, subtitled ‘An Indictment of the Roman Catholic Church’ by H.G. Wells, is a 96-page wartime book first published in 1943. Wells lived in London under the regular German Luftwaffe bombings from across the English Channel. He attacks Pope Pius XII and calls for the bombing of the city of Rome. And it’s also a hostile history of the Roman Catholic Church. Apparently Wells was an atheist and had a long history of anti-Catholic writings across many years.


Another spectacularly brilliant capture from the James Webb telescope.

NASA writes:

“A dramatic blade made of red gaseous wisps comes down top-to-bottom in the center of the image as smaller green wisps feather out in horizontal directions. A bright star shrouded in blue light is near the center of the bow-like blade. Blue dots in different sizes dot the background of the image, signifying neighboring stars.”⁣


As Alex spews his hates and lies in a U.S. courtroom, reminded today we can draw a straight line from a moment in history to his deceptions and deep ugliness. Today is the anniversary of Reagan’s repeal of the Fairness Doctrine, the corner stone of my academic writing. Thank you for the reminder, Jon Meacham. It was on August 4th 1987 a decision was made that altered the trajectory of our news and information platforms, and landed the U.S. amidst false prophets, conspiracies, lies and polarization. January 6th doesn’t happen if Reagan left it alone. It’s how we got Rush and the state propaganda known as FOX. (Not news, just FOX.) Think of it like this using the medium of radio as an example. Radio stations no longer had to show both sides of a topic and conservatives quickly outpaced liberals. Cue Newt Gingrich, too, and his ‘Contract with America.’  After that, Rupert Murdoch, Roger Ailes, and the FOX brotherhood. Devastating decision, Ronnie.

Bonne Nuit.

Dayle in Limoux – Day #29

August 3, 2022

‘The stone with the Dove is to be found at Minerve, in Southern France at the site of an ancient Cathafortress near the region Rennes Le Chateau. It was carved by Jean-Luc Severac in commemoration of the 140 Cathars who were buried alive there in 1210 as a result of persecution by the Church of Rome. Elizabeth Van Buren writes about the Cathars in her book, THE SIGN OF THE DOVE:

“These people called themselves the Pure. They said that they were waiting the return of the Paraclete, the reign of the Holy Spirit. They were known as Cathari or Albigensians and were respected by the local clergy and the nobility, although they were considered unrealistic in their ideals.”‘

And when their numbers grew, and Catholic villagers started agreeing with their principles and apostolic living, the pope [Innocent III] had them brutally slaughtered.

[prioryofthewhitestone.wordpress.com]

The first image above depicts Cathars being forced to leave with nothing, not even fully clothed. The year was 1209. Word had reached many villages about the massive massacre in Béziers, so surrendered without a fight. The villagers in Carcassonne were trying to hold out in their heavily fortified castle (still gloriously standing today), yet their water supply was cut off from them, and they had to give in to the Inquisition.

The dove, in the second image, is a symbol of the Cathars, which is translated from Greek as ‘pure,’ which is how they lived their lives.

Maybe it’s the dove that had me thinking about Noah, and other Biblical stories about the Dove. I thought about the film Noah with Russell Crowe. I’ve only seen it once, in 2014, and thought it was brilliantly created by Darren Aronofsky who directed and co-wrote. Some powerful lines in the film speak to our issues today, like climate breakdown, viruses, and violence. Noah assures his grandfather that the end will come by water (purification), the grandfather was sure it was fire. Round II…fire. Grandfather got it right, Gaia is burning.

[Noah can be see on Netflix until August 31st.]

Other notable and timely declarations from Noah and his grandfather:

‘Men are going to be punished for what they’ve done to the world.’

‘The wickedness is in all of us.’

‘Everything that was beautiful, everything that was good, we shattered.’

Indeed.

I think I know why I was pulled to revisit the film again.

First day back out after a 10-day isolation. Hot. Very hot. Another heat wave is descending, like the fourth this summer. Everyone is talking about how unusual it is to be this hot for this long. The two women there were so kind and helpful, we communicated!, and they gave me some ideas since I hike everywhere I explore. I think I can make it to a sacred space that I visited once before, St. Salvayre.

Powerful, magical energy in this tiny hamlet with three houses and two farms. I was there a long while. The history is ancient with a Roman-type standing stone not far from the entry in this ancient church, again, party of the sacred geometry in the area. The church was built around the stone, still protruding from the earth. I hope to be there again in the next couple of days.

Not tons of energy yet out and about, and with the heat, pas bon. 98 today. Had to stock up on my water supplies, too. I drank a ton of liquids over the last 10 days; very little appetite.

No one is masking.

Infections are way up all over France. The woman who owns my building may be finally able to leave the hospital tomorrow after 11/12 days. Her sister and daughter are here now to assist her. She had to be put on a respirator at one point, and she has underlying medical conditions, too. My hope is that she’ll start masking…and her family. Long covid is causing major health problems now. In Italy, one of the heaviest hit areas for Covid back in 2020, now reporting massive numbers of diabetes along with heavy reports of neurological ailments. And…Monkey Pox. Those numbers are going up, too.

‘Everything that was beautiful, everything that was good, we shattered.’

We’re going to need a lot of doves.

Stay safe.

Mask.

Distance.

Bonne Nuit.

Dayle in Limoux – Day #28

August 2, 2022

Love this capture more than I can say.


Two more negative tests! Let the cartography begin. :) Charting my own map for more Cathar exploration in the magical and beautifully heretical Languedoc/Occitanie.

Been reading about so much of this regions history today and seemingly can not stop saying D a g o b e r t, as in King Dabobert (French pronunciation!). It’s like a chant, or mantra…or just fun to say. He died in 629 and has been described as the last king of the Merovingian dynasty to wield any real royal power.

Say it like this…:)

Bonne Nuit.

Dayle in Limoux – Day #27

August 1, 2022

Waldensian symbol Lux lucet in tenebris, “A light shines in the darkness.”

Isn’t this so beautiful?! Discovered this Waldensian symbol reading and researching the Languedoc/Occitanie region of France. The Waldensians were an ascetic movement within Western Christianity started in the 12th century before the Reformation. They embraced poverty and simplicity, and believed many of the Catholic clergy were unworthy due to their associations to wealth, divinity, and power, and claiming to be ‘divine communicators with God.’ They were pacifists and believed people should have the right to read the Bible for themselves. So, of course, they were deemed heretics, even though they followed the gospel and believed followers should live as apostles. They were persecuted and massacred throughout the centuries. One particularly horrific slaying took place in 1655 in Piedmont, Italy, bordering France. Thousands were brutally murdered and later inspired John Milton to write a sonnet titled, ‘On the Late Masacre in Piedmont.’

‘…even them who kept the truth so pure of old, 

when all our fathers worshiped stocks and stones;

forget not: in thy book record their groans…’

The historical account of the massacre is harrowing, and very very difficult to read. Dogma has always served us so well, hasn’t it.

So this happened today. :)

Day 8. I’m going to test again in the morning to confirm it isn’t a false negative. Ten days are what many epidemiologists are recommending to prohibit infecting others. The CDC in the U.S. is still promoting five days without a negative test before recirculating. Pas bon. I felt better on day five, but. I was still positive. How did I know? Because I t e s t e d. And then a bit of a relapse on day seven. If I was out and about, no doubt I could have infected other people. Numbers are going way up again, while noticing many people walking around with seemingly heavy colds, coughing and congestion. How many of those are Covid +? Most likely, quite a few. My bout started with an intense sore throat and the last symptom to abate.

Mask.

Distance.

Keep the colds at home.

T E S T.

And Power Path says it could be a bumpy ride.

Courage is for moving forward into your next step.

Determination is for doing whatever it takes to follow through.

Flexibility is for adjusting and refining as needed during this erratic and unpredictable time. It is a good month to plan ahead but with adjustments when necessary.

The proactive resiliency we hopefully ended up with last month leads us into the challenges of August beginning with a tension created by seemingly opposing influences, pushing and pulling and forcing decisions we may not feel ready for. Tension can be a proactive energy that fuels change and inspires you to action. We need to be careful during these first days not to act out of reaction but to consider our bids for power carefully and practically. Decisions and intentions need to come from our own intuitive truth and from the emotional intelligence of your heart. If you overthink or obsess, you will only add to the potential confusion and possibly lose out on a good opportunity.

[You can read more at thepowerpath.com.]

Tomorrow, the journey begins…again. Ten day Covid interlude, ready for some pre-adventure planning. So much to explore! And learning loads about the layers of deep history in this magical, beautifully heretical region of France. The energy is palpable, signaling constantly, ‘Healing the Universe is an inside job.’ [Mindwalk, Le Mont-Saint-Michel.] Another remarkable creation from this area deep in the south of France, the Troubadours, or if female, a Trobairitz. They were performers of Old Occitan lyric poetry, mostly about chivalry and courtly love. The town of Puivert welcomed the Troubadours in the 12th century and at The Chateau de Puivert, still standing although badly damaged after the Albigensian Crusade.

It’s spectacular. Found some Occitanie Troubadour music today.

Here’s a listen.

Bonne nuit.

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