Sun Valley

Community Voice

September 3, 2020

“No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted” – Aesop

Community Radio

I met Felix Belmont when I was teenager. He was a recent retiree who moved to our town and got involved in starting our community radio station. Over the decades that he devoted himself to the station he raised thousands of dollars, hosted a music show, interviewed the County Commissioners every month, hosted a wildly popular call in show about financial management, and served on the governing board multiple times. In 2011, at 93 years old, he was honored by NFCB with the Volunteer of the Year Award and a whole group of people from my hometown were there to cheer him on as he knocked it out of the park with his moving speech.
 
Felix is 102 now and pretty much sharp as a tack. Last week he loaded up in the car with his daughter Louise to move to her place in Indiana. It was just time and we all knew it. People lined the main street to wave goodbye and smile through their masks. He had a police escort that stopped in front of the radio station building (which is named after him), so that well-wishers could honor him and intrepid reporters could collect the audio. As the caravan moved out toward the highway, our community choir was there to surround the car and sing “Auld Lang Syne,” “America the Beautiful,” and “I’ll Be Seeing You.” There was hardly a dry eye, and as a member of the choir, I can tell you that “Auld Lang Syne” nearly did me in. The final salute was the flashing highway sign that proclaimed “We Love You Felix” as he rolled out of town.
 
I could write volumes about my many conversations and adventures with Felix over the 40 years I have known him but there isn’t time for that here. I simply wanted to paint the picture of an ordinary man who was kind and showed up for his community, and in his own way changed the world. He changed my world, he changed the community, he changed the station. I asked him many times what the station meant to him and he gave basically the same answer every time, “KVNF is family to me. They accept me for who I am and help me feel that I belong to something that matters.”
 
As the scope and complexity of the challenges we face unleash fear and trepidation, my hope is that we remember the transformative power of community radio and the friendship it amplifies and uplifts every single day across this country. There is simple beauty in that… even in the most complicated times.

Sally Kane, CEO, National Federation of Community Broadcasters

Community Radio for the Wood River Valley, Sun Valley, Idaho.

KDPI is a local non-profit community radio station. It is a broadcast platform for collective voice operated by volunteers in the community. We also serve as a platform for eclectic music, information, and education, providing a medium for the hundreds of non-profit organizations in our Wood River Valley.

 

All people.

July 3, 2020

4th of July

‘There is only one true flight from the world: it is not an escape from conflict anguish, and suffering, but the flight from dignity and separation, to unity and peace in the love of other [people].’

-Thomas Merton, Seeds of Contemplation

What Dorothy Day called ‘a revolution of the heart’ is blossoming in our streets, where revolutionaries seem confident America can spend less on war and police, make the 1% and corporations pay their fare share and ensure healthcare, living wages, etc., for all. -Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II

NPR

Frederick Douglass’ Descendants Deliver His ‘Fourth Of July’ Speech

How can you watch and not weep? 4th of July belongs to all of us. It must.

‘In this short film, five young descendants of Frederick Douglass read and respond to excerpts of his famous speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” which asks all of us to consider America’s long history of denying equal rights to Black Americans.’

Douglass Washington Morris II, 20 (he/him) Isidore Dharma Douglass Skinner, 15 (they/their) Zoë Douglass Skinner, 12 (she/her) Alexa Anne Watson, 19 (she/her) Haley Rose Watson, 17 (she/her)

Love will rise above all.

Sun Valley, Idaho.

 

Tools for Our Time

April 6, 2020

Wise, compassionate brilliance from Sara Gorham at Light on the Mountains in Ketchum [Sun Valley], Idaho.

When I was in my twenties, I did a lot of living and traveling in the far corners of the world, spending the better part of that decade improvising one adventure after another, generally without itinerary but always open to whatever showed up. In those days you couldn’t Google where to stay in Calcutta before you went to Calcutta. You just went, trusting that things would work out and generally they did. To be honest, that youthful boldness and assurance amazes me now, but at the time it seemed unremarkable, just a way of being.

Now, with all that is going on in the world, the daily challenges, the unknowable future, I’m starting to think it might be time for me to dust off that youthful assurance and the skill sets and assumptions that went with it. It would appear they could be useful in our current moment when none of us can Google what’s ahead. Instead, the road to what’s next is being laid one brick at a time, just ahead of our footsteps. So, what can we do to best prepare for the novelty of our unfolding future? If I were to take another tip from my younger self, I might suggest we pack light, for it isn’t stuff that we’ll need, but rather the skills and mindset that will help us land well, wherever we land. Here are three things we might consider, things that never failed to serve my younger adventuresome self: curiosity, adaptability and optimism.

We can be curious about the possibilities available to us, about what we might learn and what we might create as the old assumptions of separation fall away. Instead of casting about for what was, we can learn to be adaptable and open to the new “what is,” remaining centered in the moment as things change and evolve. And if we can hold an optimism in our hearts, an expectation for good, we can carry ourselves, not just forward, but upward, buoyed by our knowing that we are at our best and our truest when we are led by our love and caring and not driven by our fears.

We are being gifted with a common experience. It is not an easy passage. We do not make light of the grief and suffering that is part of this experience, but it does afford us a view of our unmistakable unity, of our commonality of being. Let us not waste that realization. I have no doubt that the seas will eventually calm and that the ship we’re sailing will once again right itself, but I suspect that when our ship makes landfall, we will find ourselves on an altered shore, a new horizon. The good news is that our role is not just to arrive at our new horizon, but to co-create it. To best do that we need to be aware and intentional, mindful of our mindset and ready to use our best skill sets, so that the post-pandemic culture we create reflects the heart of our shared humanity and the very best within us all.

COVID…and hope.

March 23, 2020

Sharing a message from one of the spiritual leaders in our valley, Sun Valley, Idaho.

Viral Hopes by Sara Gorham
Well. Here we are, friends, living in interesting times. Every day the ground shifts beneath our feet, while the news assures us that even more disruption lies ahead. The invitations to fear are everywhere, and seldom has the unknown felt so unknowable. That said, though I do not wish to diminish the pain and loss brought on by the current pandemic, I actually have some high hopes for that little scrap of DNA we call the coronavirus. I have high hopes for the potential of what it might be able to teach us. My apologies to the virus if such expectations are too much to pin on the shoulders of so small a microbe.
I think this virus and the disruption it’s causing have the potential to bring us together and to help us see each other as we truly are – a unity, an interconnected family. I see it reminding us of the inherent uncertainty of life and how helping each other in hard times is the best way to deal with that uncertainty. I am hopeful it will remind us of the blessings of the present moment, so we all learn to spend more time there. I think it can and has placed us in a deeper appreciation of all that truly matters in our lives – including an appreciation of community and a deep gratitude for our loved ones everywhere, in particular those we shelter with, whether they have two legs or four.
I see our little coronavirus as here to remind us of our kinship to the greater biology of the planet, reminding us that we are a species like any other and subject to the same natural balances and controls as other populations. I see it as a welcome chink in our hubris, our assumption that we live apart from and by different rules than the rest of life on earth.
Perhaps we might see this virus as a notice nailed to our door, sent to us from the planet letting us know she needs a break, that we all need a break, from the constant taking and despoiling. Empty smokestacks and grounded jets may cause economic pain, but they also create breathing room and put blue back in the sky.
As business as usual grinds to a halt, we busy modern humans suddenly find ourselves gifted with the unfamiliar phenomena of unscheduled time. In that collective pregnant pause, I hope we might be reminded of the fine art of being which, in turn, might allow us to stand down a bit from our constant doing. And while we pause, I hope we listen – to the voice within, to the needs of our neighbors, and to the chorus of unity that hums in our hearts, waiting to be heard.
So yes, this virus has caused real pain, and yes, it’s probably not done. The planet has raised her voice at us, as mothers and teachers sometimes do, but I pin my hopes on all of us that we are open and capable of learning from all that this tiny virus might have to teach us as it works its way around the globe.
May we be reminded of this: that we are all One within a greater Oneness – within our common humanity, within the web of life on this planet, and most fundamentally, within the Divine Infinite. It is a simple and profound truth, claimed around the world and throughout the ages, and now taught to us once again, this time by the tiniest of teachers. The opportunity now is for all of us, individually and collectively, to listen and learn and, from that place of realization, to create a more thoughtful, compassionate and interconnected tomorrow.
Ketchum, Idaho
’Those who love their own noise are impatient of everything
else. They constantly defile the silence of the forests and the mountains and the sea.
They for through silent nature in very direction with their machines, for fear that the 
calm world might accuse them of their own emptiness. The urgency of
their swift movement seems to ignore the tranquility of nature by
pretending to have a purpose. The loud plane seems for a moment to deny the reality 
of the clouds and of the sky by its direction, its noise, and its pretended
strength. The silence of the sky remains when the plane has gone. The
tranquility of the clouds will remain when the plane has fallen apart. It is the
silence of the world that is real. Our noise, our business, and all our fatuous statements 
about our purposes—these are the illusions.’
 
-No Man Is an Island [1955]
From Rebecca Solnit, Hope in the Dark, A Paradise Built in Hell
“For me, is not optimism, that everything’s going to be fine and we can just sit back. And that’s too much like pessimism, which is that everything’s going to suck and we can just sit back. Hope, for me, just means a Buddhist sense of uncertainty, of coming to terms with the fact that we don’t know what will happen and that there’s maybe room for us to intervene. And that we have to let go of the certainty people seem to love more than hope and know that we don’t know what’s going to happen. We live in a very surprising world where nobody anticipated the way the Berlin Wall would fall or the Arab Spring would rise up, the impact of Occupy Wall Street. Obama was unelectable six months before he was elected.
 
It’s as though in some violent gift you’ve been given a kind of spiritual awakening where you’re close to mortality in a way that makes you feel more alive; you’re deeply in the present and can let go of past and future and your personal narrative, in some ways. You have shared an experience with everyone around you, and you often find very direct, but also metaphysical senses of connection to the people you suddenly have something in common with.
“We surviveand then we die.” -Ojibway Elder
Please read this article from Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter specializing in plagues and pestilences. He covers diseases of the world’s poor, including AIDS, Ebola, malaria, swine and bird flu, mad cow disease, SARS, and so on.
#extremesocialdistancing #COVID19US

The Virus Can Be Stopped, but Only With Harsh Steps, Experts Say

Terrifying though the coronavirus may be, it can be turned back. China, South Korea, Singapore and Taiwan have demonstrated that, with furious efforts, the contagion can be brought to heel.

Whether they can keep it suppressed remains to be seen. But for the United States to repeat their successes will take extraordinary levels of coordination and money from the country’s leaders, and extraordinary levels of trust and cooperation from citizens. It will also require international partnerships in an interconnected world.

There is a chance to stop the coronavirus. This contagion has a weakness.

Although there are incidents of rampant spread, as happened on the cruise ship Diamond Princess, the coronavirus more often infects clusters of family members, friends and work colleagues, said Dr. David L. Heymann, who chairs an expert panel advising the World Health Organization on emergencies.

No one is certain why the virus travels in this way, but experts see an opening nonetheless. “You can contain clusters,” Dr. Heymann said. “You need to identify and stop discrete outbreaks, and then do rigorous contact tracing.”

But doing so takes intelligent, rapidly adaptive work by health officials, and near-total cooperation from the populace. Containment becomes realistic only when Americans realize that working together is the only way to protect themselves and their loved ones.

In interviews with a dozen of the world’s leading experts on fighting epidemics, there was wide agreement on the steps that must be taken immediately.

Those experts included international public health officials who have fought AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, flu and Ebola; scientists and epidemiologists; and former health officials who led major American global health programs in both Republican and Democratic administrations.

Americans must be persuaded to stay home, they said, and a system put in place to isolate the infected and care for them outside the home. Travel restrictions should be extended, they said; productions of masks and ventilators must be accelerated, and testing problems must be resolved.

[…]

Just as generals take the lead in giving daily briefings in wartime — as Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf did during the Persian Gulf war — medical experts should be at the microphone now to explain complex ideas like epidemic curves, social distancing and off-label use of drugs.

The microphone should not even be at the White House, scientists said, so that briefings of historic importance do not dissolve into angry, politically charged exchanges with the press corps, as happened again on Friday.

Instead, leaders must describe the looming crisis and the possible solutions in ways that will win the trust of Americans.

Above all, the experts said, briefings should focus on saving lives and making sure that average wage earners survive the coming hard times — not on the stock market, the tourism industry or the president’s health. There is no time left to point fingers and assign blame.

The next priority, experts said, is extreme social distancing.

If it were possible to wave a magic wand and make all Americans freeze in place for 14 days while sitting six feet apart, epidemiologists say, the whole epidemic would sputter to a halt.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/22/health/coronavirus-restrictions-us.html#click=https://t.co/7cy71sKLVG

October Yoga in Sun Valley!

September 29, 2019

Cathie Caccia October Yoga Workshop
~
Last year’s workshop sold out; special rates available to stay at the Limelight, too.

https://www.limelighthotels.com/ketchum/the-hotel

Community Radio’s Town Square

September 27, 2019

“I knew I wanted to be in radio when I was 6 years old,” said Dayle Ohlau, now 59 and soon to take over as general manager of KDPI, the local nonprofit community radio station based in Ketchum.

Ohlau, who had previously earned a master’s degree in human behavior, decided to return to academia. She enrolled at the California Institute for Integral Studies in San Francisco to pursue a Ph.D. in the School of Transformative Studies.

Two and half years later, she has completed her coursework and is preparing an 80-page thesis proposal titled “Homo-Spiritus: Radical Compassion, a New Paradigm for Spirit-Based Journalism.”

“My work is theoretical rather than quantitative,” Ohlau said. “It traces our history from the end of World War I to today, and studies media biases that led us to where we are now, with a distrust of the media and a weakening of the Fourth Estate [journalism]. We have become so tribal. Due to our confirmation biases we only listen to or read what we already believe.”

A recent $11,000 donation from 100 Men Who Care, a local philanthropic group, drew Ohlau back to the nonprofit station that she had helped General Manager Mike Scullion get started in 2013. She will be able to draw a small salary putting together new ideas for the station.

“For me this will be a synergy between my studies and my radio career,” she said. ‘It’s an opportunity to generate compassionate and ethical communication in our community. I think of it as harkening back to the days of the town square.”

https://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/valley_people/valley-people/article_10631b36-e07e-11e9-ba8a-0bcdeb96644b.html

Where a (wo)man feels free.

January 7, 2019

Idaho Press

December 20, 2018

All those transplants living in Idaho? Visits from their friends and family are big for tourism

Tourism, Idaho’s third-largest industry behind agriculture and technology, grew by 11 percent in 2018. In 2017, Idaho businesses made $3.7 billion in direct travel dollars, according to data collected by the Idaho Department of Commerce. They recorded 34.3 million Idaho trips in 2017, 40 percent overnight and 60 percent just visiting Idaho for the day. More than 70 percent of Idaho travelers in 2017 were from outside the state, the department estimates.

[…]
Places like Boise and Sun Valley are some of the biggest draws, while out-of-state visitors on multistate tours are likely to try to hit Craters of the Moon or Stanley on their way to Yellowstone or other national landmarks. Borud said Idaho tourism’s marketing budget is small, so they focus on digital campaigns, targeting mostly women planning their family vacations.  
https://www.idahopress.com/news/local/all-those-transplants-living-in-idaho-visits-from-their-friends/article_4611f583-bbe7-511b-80ef-b9879d9c7eca.html

KDPI 88.5 FM

March 11, 2016

kdpi_logo

Community Radio

‘Where the locals get vocal.’

http://kdpifm.org

Yoga…for Free

July 17, 2015

SATURDAY
8:45-9:45am 
Soul Salutations
FREE outside at Sun Valley
July 18 at Base of River Run
July 25 at Base of River Run
August 1 at Base of River Run
August 8 at Sun Valley Village Lawn
August 15 at Sun Valley Village Lawn
August 22 at Sun Valley Village Lawn
August 29 at Base of River Run

1426684824971

http://www.cathiecaccia.com

Sun Valley Institute for Resilience

July 13, 2015

 

svi_logo200_psd

The Sun Valley Institute for Resilience is a center for public education, policy leadership and investment to ensure economic prosperity, environmental protection and human well-being in its home community of Idaho’s Wood River Valley and beyond.

11731837_10153416795269144_4697604910517825586_o

(US Senator Cory Booker, and Founder/Executive Director Aimee Christensen at the 1st Sun Valley Forum on Resilience)

Senator Booker: “Across America, communities are increasingly facing challenges that are global in nature, from climate change to competition with an ever more interconnected world economy. Expanding the capacity of communities to be resilient in the face of these challenges is an urgent priority. Solving these problems should be about finding and implementing what works, and the expansion and democratization of technology is increasingly enabling communities to make more decisions based on hard data, not hunches. I’m looking forward to discussing how to turn these challenges into economic opportunities that can strengthen our communities and our country.”

SVIR:  “In partnership with leading foundations, academic institutions, corporations and nonprofits, the Institute brings together local and global resources and expertise to strengthen the area’s ability to bounce back from harm to the local economy, whether from wildfires, poor snowfall or global economic conditions, and to serve as a global resource to increase resilience far beyond.”

Did you know:

95% of the Wood River Valley’s food comes form outside the valley?

We send $80 million per year out of the Wood River Valley to pay for energy?

local-dollars-300

From Dayle’s Community Cafe: Deep gratitude to the Sun Valley Institute for Resilience for opening their 1st forum to the public. US Senator Cory Booker & great minds manifesting resiliency with Executive Director Aimee Christensen, Sunday, July 12th, at the Walnut Avenue Mall. Adapt, Survive, and Thrive!  Aimee is deeply respected across many sectors of community/local philosophy and commerce. When I first read of this new organization, I intuitively felt the connection and need in our community. This speaks to the grass roots efforts that will bypass policy and government on the national level to allow communities to thrive and evolve on the local level; i.e. not react to issues that effect our lives where we live…e.g. wild fires (still recovering from Beaver Creek), Climate Change (less snow…shorter seasons, greatly effecting our tourism in the valley, our biggest source of income for businesses, therefore, employees), power outages…e.g. Christmas 2010), drought, water rights, but to respond and evolve within the changes. The opposite of resilience is defined as ‘failure’. Failure ‘to absorb disturbance and reorganize while undergoing change.” Truly inspired by this organization and the various leaders in our valley, and beyond, who are involved with this organization and developing projects.

http://www.sunvalleyinstitute.org

(In addition to Senator Booker, other speakers at the 1st Forum, Sunday, July 12th in Sun Valley: Nancy Kete of the Rockefeller Foundation, Raul Pomares, Founder of Sonen Capital, Steve McBee, CEO of NRG Home, Collin O’Mara, CEO, National Wildlife Federation, Marco Krapels of SolarCity, Jeffery Sayer, Director of the Idaho Department of Commerce, Brooks Preston of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, Brent Stacey of the Idaho National Laboratory, Gary Dirks, Director of the Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University, Peter Horton of Pico Creek Productions, Jeff Goodell of Rolling Stone Magazine, Jennifer Leonard of The CAPROCK Group and Michael Shuman, author of Local Dollars, Local Sense.)

https://www.rockefellerfoundation.org

http://www.rmi.org

http://www.postcarbon.org/our-people/michael-shuman/

http://www.sonencapital.com

https://sustainability.asu.edu/people/julie-ann-wrigley.php

http://urbangreencouncil.org

http://www.goalzero.com

http://www.nrg.com

http://www.booker.senate.gov

NEPAL EARTHQUAKE FUNDRAISER IN SUN VALLEY

June 11, 2015

seva_logo_80034b_80x76

From the SEVA Foundation:

“We saw the destruction firsthand but also the resilience and commitment of our staff and partners as they worked to aid the victims of the earthquake”

nepal-update-2-560x420

11262474_858842184165695_1662266794974701608_o

The Power of the Heart

May 19, 2015

Power-of-the-Heart-photo1

THURSDAY, MAY 21ST, 7PM ~ SUN VALLEY OPERA HOUSE

From the director of ‘THE SECRET’, comes this unparalleled and life-changing film about the astonishing power and intelligence of your heart. Featuring some of the most inspiring and influential icons of our age including Mark Nepo, Paulo Coelho, Maya Angelou, Deepak Chopra, Isabel Allende, and Eckhart Tolle.
Film tickets available for $10 at the door.
https://www.sunvalleywellness.org/the-power-of-the-heart-f…/

Clean Web Design