Idaho

October Yoga in Sun Valley!

September 29, 2019

Cathie Caccia October Yoga Workshop
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Last year’s workshop sold out; special rates available to stay at the Limelight, too.

https://www.limelighthotels.com/ketchum/the-hotel

5B~5Signs

 

The 5B Suicide Prevention Alliance is offering “Know the Five Signs” presentations throughout the Wood River Valley to educate the community on recognizing the signs of emotional suffering and how to connect people to resources.

The 5B Suicide Prevention Alliance is comprised of Blaine County citizens and organizations working to prevent suicide and to build a culture of awareness, understanding, acceptance, and action around our community’s mental well-being.

These approximately 45-minute presentations are designed to build the community’s understanding of the many ways that suicide impacts our friends, families, clients, co-workers, and neighbors.

According to changedirection.org, we are at a crossroads when it comes to how our society addresses mental health:

“We know that one in five of our citizens has a diagnosable mental health condition, and that more Americans are expected to die this year by suicide than in car accidents. While many of us are comfortable acknowledging publicly our physical suffering, for which we almost always seek help, many more of us privately experience mental suffering, for which we almost never reach out.”

“The training was both meaningful and useful,” said Mary Williams, director of Healthy Living at the Wood River Community YMCA. “Having open dialogue about this issue helps us recognize and assist our colleagues and members who might be struggling with their mental health. I wholeheartedly recommend this training to other community businesses and nonprofits.”

eyeonsunvalley.com

For more information, visit https://nami-wrv.org/5balliance/. Or contact Erin Pfaeffle at 208-727-8734 or pfaeffle@slhs.org or Laurie Strand at 208-578-5443… lstrand@blaineschools.org.

 

Community Radio’s Town Square

September 27, 2019

“I knew I wanted to be in radio when I was 6 years old,” said Dayle Ohlau, now 59 and soon to take over as general manager of KDPI, the local nonprofit community radio station based in Ketchum.

Ohlau, who had previously earned a master’s degree in human behavior, decided to return to academia. She enrolled at the California Institute for Integral Studies in San Francisco to pursue a Ph.D. in the School of Transformative Studies.

Two and half years later, she has completed her coursework and is preparing an 80-page thesis proposal titled “Homo-Spiritus: Radical Compassion, a New Paradigm for Spirit-Based Journalism.”

“My work is theoretical rather than quantitative,” Ohlau said. “It traces our history from the end of World War I to today, and studies media biases that led us to where we are now, with a distrust of the media and a weakening of the Fourth Estate [journalism]. We have become so tribal. Due to our confirmation biases we only listen to or read what we already believe.”

A recent $11,000 donation from 100 Men Who Care, a local philanthropic group, drew Ohlau back to the nonprofit station that she had helped General Manager Mike Scullion get started in 2013. She will be able to draw a small salary putting together new ideas for the station.

“For me this will be a synergy between my studies and my radio career,” she said. ‘It’s an opportunity to generate compassionate and ethical communication in our community. I think of it as harkening back to the days of the town square.”

https://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/valley_people/valley-people/article_10631b36-e07e-11e9-ba8a-0bcdeb96644b.html

Hailey, Idaho’s New Town Square Development

April 30, 2019

Courthouse Location

#1

#2

#3

#4

Library Location

#1

#2

#3

#4

Developers: BYLA Landscape Architects, Ketchum & Lyon Landscape Architects, Sun Valley

https://www.haileycityhall.org/planning/documents/2019TownSquarePublicOutreachTimeline.pdf

Developers and the city combined comments from previous workshops focused on vision, amenities and activities. Discussion continues at the next P&Z meeting, Mon., May 6th, at 5:30. For landscape designs, four at each location.

 

“If these kids are the future, our future is bright.”

April 1, 2019

One Stone/Boise, Idaho

‘Rise: Voice of a New Generation captures the story of One Stone, a one-of-a-kind, student-led high school in Boise, Idaho, that is reinventing education and changing the balance of power to put students in charge of their own learning. Follow the story of one of the only schools in the country run by students who are exploring a new way forward where their voices shape the future of education and the world.’

It’s exciting to see how this documentary authentically captures our voices as well as this moment in One Stone’s history.

— Lili Serio, One Stone Learner

Trailer:

https://onestone.org/rise-voice-of-a-new-generation

 

Public service and community growth.

January 21, 2019

As term ends, a commissioner considers legacy,

Larry Schoen looks back at a career in public life

by Mark Dee
Idaho Mountain Express

“I think elected office is immensely challenging. And I felt that, on a personal level, I needed that sort of challenge. I needed to try to live up to my ideals of public service.” Larry Schoen, former Blaine County commissioner

Schoen, who is 63, has had time to consider how a self-described private man transitioned to so public a life in Blaine County. And, he’s had time to consider his motto, which he attached to that career like a goal more than a decade ago: “To leave office with my integrity intact.”

He sat through plans for rampant growth, and saw them hollowed by the global belt-tightening of the Great Recession. He presided during natural disasters, fires and floods that wolfed up swaths of the Wood River Valley in quick and angry bites. He worked on wolves themselves, and other environmental fights that pitted interest against interest. There was Bowe Bergdahl, and the frenzy that swept through Hailey afterward. There were debates with Idaho Power, and Deer Creek and Camp Rainbow Gold—and thousands of other rulings, small to most everyone but the world to those involved, the discrete decisions that make up a career in politics that, at times, surprised Schoen himself.

“I’m a very private person,” he said. “You won’t find a Facebook page for me. You won’t find a lot of personal information out there. I hate having my picture taken, and I’m not very good at remembering people’s names. I’m not the sort of person you’d think of as primed for political life. But I think government service is important. I think elected office is immensely challenging. And I felt that, on a personal level, I needed that sort of challenge. I needed to try to live up to my ideals of public service. ‘To leave office with my integrity intact’—it all goes back to that.”

He turned 18 in 1973, a draft year at the ragged end of America’s involvement in Vietnam. It was a lottery—just luck that his number wasn’t called. Today, with the safety of decades between then and now, he wishes it was.

“I never did military service—I always regretted that,” he said. “I felt that at some point in my life, I needed to do some sort of serious public service. In a way, on a personal level, running for public office was my way of compensating.”

 If his work as a reporter helped him explain policy, his life as a farmer helped shape it. He’s tried the three main modes of American living—urban, rural and suburban—and his view for the future of Blaine County is steeped in that experience.

“Hardly anybody has put as much effort into reading things, and parsing language,” said Len Harlig, a former county commissioner who remains a close observer of Blaine County politics. “He’s absolutely meticulous, going through materials to make sure they are correct, and accurate. He brought an efficiency to ordinances. His viewpoint was thorough, exhaustive and unaccepting of any comment not based in vigorous research. Even when you reached different conclusions, you never doubted the effort.”

His environmental record can match anyone’s in the county, according to Harlig, whether that meant advocating for conservation, or securing easements for open space and recreational access, or updating recycling and solid waste.

But Schoen describes himself as a progressive, and a pragmatist. Those combine to form a view of government that is closely tied to customer service, and much of his legacy—from internal communications, to organizational structure, to budgeting procedure—is, like the engine of any operation, hidden under the hood.

“As a county commissioner, Larry was a consummate professional,” said current board Chairman Jacob Greenberg. “His journalism background meant he was our go-to person to articulate policy.”

“Some of the most desirable and valuable communities in America have some of the strictest zoning—thought-out zoning codes that try to project the present and future values of those communities,” he said. “That’s especially true of small ski towns in Europe. And that’s why they still have their charm. We don’t want to lose our charm.”

Maintaining it was part of the Blaine County 2025 planning effort that Schoen participated in during the mid-2000s, as a member of P&Z. Back then, elected officials prepared for an unending boom. There was talk of two new towns—one by Gannett, another at Timmerman Junction. Projections envisioned the population swelling to 80,000 people in 20 years. Soon, Schoen thought, development pressure would burst out into the unincorporated county like champagne past a cork.

 “I don’t know that they are all on the same page,” he said. “People acknowledge certain common values, like the need for affordable housing, the need to preserve our public lands and recreational access. The conversations really haven’t been had in a long time. Ketchum is doing its thing. Sun Valley does its thing. Hailey’s doing its thing. We need to work on a regional equation. If people are opposed to increased density in cities, but there’s development pressure, there’s only one place for it to go, and that’s out in the county. The question is, do we want to turn it into a suburbanized area? That’s a question for the community. The community needs to answer.”

Schoen’s personal answer is written across his land. He placed a conservation easement on the property curtailing its ability to be developed; those acres will never be subdivided.

“I would judge his view of county government as that of a purist,” he said. “He interpreted it as it was intended, and was fair in its application.”

Schoen: “When I talk to students, I tell them if you’re going to enter elected office, your main goal shouldn’t be to get re-elected. It should be to do what’s in the best interest of the community. To uphold the law. In a very dynamic, engaged county like ours, that will leave some people happy. Others won’t be. Eventually, that catches up with you.”

“There are roles I’ve been able to play because I was a county commissioner. I’m proud of the connections I’ve made, what I’ve been able to do. This job’s been immensely rewarding—for me personally, and, I hope, for our community.”

Full Moon & Winter Solstice

December 20, 2018

Solstice is Friday, December 21 at 3:22pm Mountain Standard Time

☆☆☆

Full Moon is Saturday, December 22 at 10:48am Mountain Standard Time.

[POWER PATH]

Solstices are always about a powerful s gift from the old into something new. This one is no exception. They are important times to release the past and to gain some clarity and set some intentions for the future.

“As we are moving into a time where the element of earth is prevalent, this solstice offers an opportunity for grounding and anchoring this intentions with the help of Pacha Mama. On the other hand, the grounded quality can also bring up places of resistance, stubbornness and where you are still holding on to something past. Watch bones, teeth and joints during this time.

In addition to our usual recommendation to do some kind of ceremony or ritual, we also recommend the you make some kind of a change in your physical environment to honor the change of season and the power of the solstice. Get rid of something, move some furniture, bring in something new that better represents who you are. The solstice is also a time of renewal. What needs to be freshened up in your life?

For a ritual or ceremony, you can write down what you wish to release, burn or bury the writing, and then focus on your new intentions, writing down what is clear to you at this time.

As we are moving into a year of chaos fighting structure, how you use this time of the solstice (and the full moon on Saturday) will help you to get your ducks in a row in anticipation of the times.

The Solstice this year is followed closely by a Full Moon that honors the other influence of 2019, water. Water represents the emotions, fluidity, flexibility, and is a powerful agent of change. Earth and water will be working together in 2019 either harmoniously bringing fertility and balance into your life, or forcefully, creating change at inconvenient times. Use this Full Moon time in conjunction with the Solstice to check in with your intuition and emotional self to see the truth of what you need to let go of and the truth about what you truly wish to bring in to your life. It is a time where being around others of like mind and heart is helpful. As addictions will be a challenge in 2019, our sincere hope and wish for everyone is for a collective release of the addiction to suffering.

Another good way to use this Full Moon/Solstice time is to contemplate all the structures in your life, all the containers you have created to support you. Are they still in resonance with you? Or do they need some adjustment in order to give you some room to change? Don’t be afraid of a little chaos as you are moving things around both physically and emotionally. Do it in bits and pieces one step at a time and as long as you keep things moving, you will be fine.”

 

SVI ☀️

Sun Valley Institute, “advancing economic, and social resilience in Blaine County with models and programs that are scalable and replicable nationally.”

Blaine’s future.

November 27, 2018

Dear Community,

As the Sun Valley Institute moves into its fourth year, we’re reflecting on what we’ve accomplished and what we’ve learned, and are looking forward to what we can do better and take to greater scale. With the support of our community, we’ve made an impactful start and now are poised to expand and accelerate our contribution to resilient prosperity in the Blaine County region and beyond. We’d like to share with you a review of what we’ve done, some thoughts on where we’re headed, and, if this excites you, ask for yourcontinued support.

As you know, SVI was founded to advance economic, ecological and social resilience in Blaine County with models and programs that are scalable and replicable nationally. As we read reports of staggering wildfire impacts throughout the west, water shortages and food supply issues around the world, as well as increasing social division, we are reminded that the urgency of creating real, lasting community resilience has never been greater.

Our focus now is to sharpen our impact, turn risk into opportunity, and help Blaine County and the global community prepare for these changes in a way that provides lasting, stable prosperity for everyone, regardless of economic standing, nationality, age, and gender. This is at once a monumental challenge, an exciting possibility, and an urgent need – here, across our state, and far beyond.

SVI will respond by strengthening our support of our programs in four powerful areas:

  • Shift to resilient, cleaner, locally-generated and renewable energy supplies coupled with increased energy efficiency and storage technologies to provide greater security, cost-savings, job creation, and environmental benefits;
  • Shift to increased reliance on locally and regionally produced food, supporting our rural neighbors and economy, and decreasing dependence upon the unstable and ecologically damaging industrial food system;
  • Develop plans, policies and projects based on systems thinking and scenario planning; and
  • Convene those invested in building solutions to accelerate impact, such as through the Blaine County Resilience Workshops (first one on December 3rd) and our 5th annual global Sun Valley Forum, July 23-26, 2019, with top thinkers, doers and leaders.

2018 highlights and 2019 plans:

Energy: SVI partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Laboratory, local cities and the county to develop a digital blueprint of Blaine County’s electricity system,  one of just three communities nationwide. We identified the power needs of our critical response infrastructure (fire, police, water, medical, communications, etc.), and potential projects  to ensure ongoing operations during service interruptions. Next up for 2019, we intend to build plans and secure the capital (grant, government and private investment) to meet our critical loads and create local jobs for positive economic and environmental impact.

Food: Local food is a powerful lever to benefit health, economic prosperity and our environment. SVI’s food program, the Local Food Alliance (LFA), in partnership with University of Idaho and Blaine County Food Council, has engaged a nationally renowned food system analyst and economist, Ken Meter, to create a Community Food System Strategic Plan. Ken’s decades of experience will help us to prioritize food system infrastructure work and projects, such as food storage and distribution. This is a pivotal time: in 2019, we are excited to act on the recommendations.

Land Use: Blaine County has significant open space and land resources that can provide much-needed affordable food and housing and ample recreation and wild spaces. To help optimize our land use for immediate and long-term benefits, the Institute consults to landowners and developers to deploy innovative land-use strategies and new business models and to access capital and investment partners.

Community Planning: Since its inception, the Institute frequently has been approached to consult with local leaders on opportunities and risks. Leveraging SVI’s knowledge and experience, we have connected these leaders with best practices for policies, strategy, investment and technology resources and innovative business models. In 2018 and 2019, in partnership with Blaine County and other organizations, the Institute is leading our community in a formal process to identify and address Blaine County’s top threats and to transform risks into opportunities. We are interviewing dozens of community members and convening workshops to identify our current gaps, consider future trends, and prioritize specific projects (e.g., greenhouses, cold food storage, optic fiber for telecommunications) via the lens of climate change. The Institute will ensure each project has implementation plans to bring them to fruition.

Sun Valley Forum: In Summer 2019 we will host our 5th annual Sun Valley Forum where we catalyze connections, conversations and capital for a more secure, prosperous and healthy world. We gather leaders and innovators to share expertise, accelerate efforts and unearth opportunities for new collaborations and solutions. Speakers come from diverse perspectives and experience, from U.S. Senator Cory A. Booker to visionary Paul Hawken, from Paul Allen’s Vulcan Productions to adventurer-athlete-advocates including Arctic explorer and philanthropist Sir Robert Swan. We include companies like Hewlett Packard, Microsoft and Domo, and investors like BNP Paribas/Bank of the West, Generation Investment Management and Turner Impact Capital. We’ve watched the magic of the Forum lead to new partnerships and accelerated, scaled impact, and look forward to hosting our Forum 2019 at the new Ketchum Argyros Performing Arts Center, July 23-26, 2019.

According to the World Economic Forum’s 2018 Global Risk Report, three of the five top global risks in the next 10 years are environment-related: extreme weather events (#1), natural disasters (#2), and the failure of climate change mitigation and adaptation (#5). The most recent report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warns that significant changes to the earth’s life support systems in the next decade, and recent California fires remind us how much we have at stake. The just-released U.S. Government National Assessment on Climate Change backs up SVI’s multi-pronged strategy, urging an integrated approach to assessing and addressing the impacts of climate change, for example how the changes to food supplies, water and electricity generation interact with each other. “It is not possible to fully understand the implications of climate change on the United States without considering the interactions among sectors and their consequences,” the report says.

The world demands our action. We have the opportunity – indeed the imperative – to lead. This requires us to be trailblazers: We innovate solutions that build our community’s economy, security and environment, while supporting others in need.

Our work is not possible without you.

We are deeply grateful for your previous support. It is clear you care about our community and want our work to thrive; we feel it every day. Please help us make 2019 our most impactful year yet and make a significant  financial contribution, whatever that is for you. Your donation is an investment, with the return of a strong, localized economy, smart land use and protected natural resources. The Institute is shaping solutions now and for the future.

Please join us to think ahead, and act now.

With gratitude,

Aimée Christensen
Founder & Executive Director, Sun Valley Institute

http://www.sunvalleyinstitute.org

14.4 Minutes

August 4, 2018
Mother Lea at Emmanuel Episcopal in Hailey, Idaho reminds us that 1% of a 24 hour day is 14.4 minutes. If we use that time every day to be a ‘lamp, lifeboat, or ladder [Rumi] we will create change.

Meanwhile, in Idaho…

March 18, 2018

Michelle Stennett
Idaho State Senate Minority Leader
Legislative News

‘Tracking Women’
Michelle writes, “After nearly three hours of debate, the Senate voted in favor of a measure that creates reporting requirements for complications that may have resulted from a pregnancy termination. The measure includes making linkages between terminations and 40 other medical conditions that may be experienced by a woman over the course of her life. The listed conditions include health complications that are seen in both men and women including comas, heart attacks, and strokes. Additionally, physicians who fail to comply with these reporting requirements face stiff fines and potential loss of license. Those who debated against the measure see it as a tremendous act of government overreach, <especially considering that no other surgical procedure in the state has similar reporting requirements.> These include a woman’s race, age, number of children she’s birthed that have lived, and number who have died. The bill would create an incredible expense for the Department of Health and Welfare, and ultimately taxpayers, to implement. I signed onto a bipartisan letter asking Governor Otter to veto the measure.”

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1.20.18

January 19, 2018

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Spirits Rebellious

January 17, 2018

The next day I left for the fields where silence reveals to the soul that which the spirit desires, and where the pure sky kills the germs of despair, nursed in the city by the narrow streets and obscured places.

Khalil Gibran

P. 34

[photo: Picabo, Idaho]

Bowe. ღ

November 3, 2017

Tommy Ahlquist in Hailey

September 29, 2017

Republican Idaho Gubernatorial candidate Tommy Ahlquist spoke at the Senior Connection in Hailey, Friday, Sept. 29th, as he continues a 44-county state tour in 44-days. He talked about his three-legged platform focused on jobs, education, and healthcare.

Introduction

Bio

Jobs

Education

Healthcare

Audience Questions

#1:

Idaho’s Medicaid Gap & Compare/Contrast to Other Gubernatorial Candidates Brad Little and Raul Labrador

#2:

Idaho Governor in a Politically Polarized Nation

#3

Trade/Vocation Education in Idaho

#4

Four-Day School Week & Improving K-12 Funding

#5

Senior Connection Medicaid Comment

#6

Senior Employment

 

For more information about KTEC/Kootenai Technical Education Campus mentioned in question #3, visit ktectraining.org.

 

KDPI 88.5 FM

March 11, 2016

kdpi_logo

Community Radio

‘Where the locals get vocal.’

http://kdpifm.org

Northern Rockies Music Festival

November 4, 2015

poster_image2015

Help fund the festival to keep it in Hailey, Idaho.

The annual Wood River Valley event started in 1977, and with competition from other festivals, it has become increasingly difficult to finance the festival and keep it viable in the valley.

There’s an online funding event account at: https://www.gofundme.com/savenrmusicfest

The 2-day festival takes place the first weekend every summer in August at Hailey’s Hop Porter Park.

Climate Change Talk in Sun Valley

September 30, 2015

scientists-clues-print

“Climate Change Dynamics” by Russ Brown
Thurs., Oct. 8, 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

*ERC
*Aimee Christensen/ Sun Valley Inst. for Resilience
*Community Library

‘Join us for a special presentation on “Climate Change Dynamics” in partnership with the Environmental Resource Center (ERC). This program, led by Russ Brown, will begin with an introduction to the history of our planet’s climate cycles. The presentation will then move into an in-depth exploration of the Earth’s three most recent major climate changes, their effects on Earth’s life, and what this ultimately means for the future of our world. After this engaging 45-minute presentation, Aimee Christensen, Executive Director for the Sun Valley Institute for Resilience, will moderate a Q&A.

Brown has a B.S. and M.S. in Chemical Engineering from New Jersey Institute of Technology and has previously worked for several corporate and national laboratory research organizations such as the Allied Chemical Corporation, Idaho National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. He has also served as the President of the Idaho Alpine Club, Idaho Environmental Council and Greater Sawtooth Preservation Council.’

Clean Web Design