2020

V O T E

July 6, 2020

 

Powered by the people…the young people.

July 1, 2020

Y

E

S

! ! !

#November2020

no más.

April 19, 2020

He lied.

He lies.

He’ll lie again.

And again.

And again.

#TrumpGenocide

 

V

O

T

E

 

November 3, 2020

 

#ConsiderElizabeth

February 17, 2020

“I was proud to fight beside Senator Reid and Barack Obama and to protect consumers—and I’ll keep fighting to protect consumers as president of the United States. Watch our new ad airing in Nevada now.”

 

[Follow the link to view :30 ad running in Nevada.]

 

pic.twitter.com/A7G9fNxjsA

#ConsiderAmy

February 15, 2020

?

Nevertheless, she persisted.

Bernie Sanders claimed victory in New Hampshire this week, with Amy Klobuchar surging to a third-place finish behind fellow moderate Pete Butti­gieg. Editor-at-Large Errin Haines takes a closer look at Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren, and whether their “endurance” approach to campaigning can translate into the momentum needed to win the Democratic nomination. Excerpts of her latest stories, published in The Washington Post, follow.

“Women are not momentum candidates. They have to prove themselves and win voters over, over the course of time. Men can get swept up in a tide of momentum that can carry them to the nomination. It’s different for women. They’re on a slow burn.”

— Democratic strategist Jen Palmieri

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) inadvertently made these three words a battle cry in 2017 when he used them to describe his decision to silence Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) for criticizing the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) to become attorney general.

Now, almost exactly three years later, the phrase seems to be a campaign strategy for Warren and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.), the two top-tier women in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.

On Tuesday night, at the first-in-the-nation primary in New Hampshire, Klobuchar surged ahead, finishing third with 19.3 percent of the vote, with more than 91 percent of precincts reporting Wednesday morning.

Bounding onto the stage in Concord, N.H., on Tuesday night, joined by her husband, John, and daughter, Abigail, Klobuchar beamed as she addressed the crowd: “Tonight is about grit. And my story, like so many of yours, is one of resilience.”

Klobuchar stunned the political class with what looked like an overnight success, but it was all part of what she said has been her nomination strategy all along: slow and steady, not shock and awe.

Warren, whose mantra is “Outwork, Out-Organize, Outlast,” is taking a similar approach. While she finished third in the Iowa caucuses and fourth in New Hampshire, hours before the polls closed Tuesday, she rolled out her endurance strategy in a memo to supporters.

“The road to the Democratic nomination is not paved with statewide winner-take-all victories,” wrote her campaign manager, Roger Lau. The campaign’s focus “is on building a broad coalition to win delegates everywhere.” He further underlined the campaign’s marathon approach by pointing to Warren’s on-the-ground staff of 1,000 people in 31 states.

Klobuchar and Warren have both said they are running campaigns of durability, an approach that may favor female candidates who tend to be judged on performance rather than potential, said Democratic strategist Jen Palmieri.

“Women are not momentum candidates,” Palmieri said. “They have to prove themselves and win voters over, over the course of time. Men can get swept up in a tide of momentum that can carry them to the nomination. It’s different for women. They’re on a slow burn.”

Such a plan explains why Klobuchar — who came in fifth in Iowa but who, her campaign said, exceeded expectations with limited resources in the state — visited all 99 counties ahead of the caucuses and made nearly two dozen trips to New Hampshire, or why Warren spends hours taking selfies and connecting with voters on a personal level.

It may also signal a shift in voters’ perceptions of electability, which has heavily favored male candidates like former vice president Joe Biden — who abandoned the state for South Carolina hours before finishing fifth on Tuesday — Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who won Tuesday’s primary, and former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete Buttigieg, who came in a close second.

Happy Birthday Susan B. Anthony!

Today marks what would have been her 200th birthday.

 

 

The year 2020 marks the centennial anniversary for women’s suffrage, when the 19th amendment took effect giving some women the right to vote in U.S. elections. And on Saturday, one of the movement’s key figures, Susan B. Anthony, would have turned 200. In honor of the famed activist and the women’s suffrage movement, a unique event is kicking off this weekend in New York. Karla Murthy reports.

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/cultural-institutions-celebrate-womens-suffrage-centennial

The Washington Post

For Klobuchar and Warren, the 2020 primary is an endurance race

This story is part of a collaboration between The Washington Post and the 19th, a nonprofit newsroom covering gender, politics and policy.

“Nevertheless, she persisted.”

Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) inadvertently made these three words a battle cry in 2017 when he used them to describe his decision to silence Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) for criticizing the nomination of Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) to become attorney general.

Now, almost exactly three years later, the phrase seems to be a campaign strategy for Warren and Sen. Amy Klobuchar (Minn.), the two top-tier women in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.

On Tuesday night, at the first-in-the-nation primary in New Hampshire, Klobuchar surged ahead, finishing third with 19.3 percent of the vote, with more than 91 percent of precincts reporting Wednesday morning.

Bounding onto the stage in Concord, N.H., on Tuesday night, joined by her husband, John, and daughter, Abigail, Klobuchar beamed as she addressed the crowd: “Tonight is about grit. And my story, like so many of yours, is one of resilience.”

Warren, whose mantra is “Outwork, Out-Organize, Outlast,” is taking a similar approach. While she finished third in the Iowa caucuses and fourth in New Hampshire, hours before the polls closed Tuesday, she rolled out her endurance strategy in a memo to supporters.

Klobuchar and Warren have both said they are running campaigns of durability, an approach that may favor female candidates who tend to be judged on performance rather than potential, said Democratic strategist Jen Palmieri.

[full read]

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/02/12/klobuchar-warren-2020-primary-is-an-endurance-race/


Also, happy birthday today to abolitionist, suffragist and friend to Susan B. Anthony, Frederick Douglas, marking what would have been his 202nd birthday.

“I would unite with anybody to do right and with nobody to do wrong.” 

In 1848, Douglass was the only African American to attend the Seneca Falls Convention, the first women’s rights convention, in upstate New York. Elizabeth Cady Stanton asked the assembly to pass a resolution asking for women’s suffrage. Many of those present opposed the idea, including influential Quakers James and Lucretia Mott. Douglass stood and spoke eloquently in favor; he said that he could not accept the right to vote as a black man if women could not also claim that right. He suggested that the world would be a better place if women were involved in the political sphere. [theodysseyonline.com]

 

#ConsiderAmy

February 8, 2020

“I know you. I will fight for you.”

Meet Amy Klobuchar

Senator Amy Klobuchar is the granddaughter of an iron ore miner, the daughter of a newspaperman and a union teacher, the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate from the state of Minnesota and candidate for President of the United States. Amy is running to bring people together, take on the major issues facing our country and to get things done. From leading the fight to win a 48-hour hospital stay for new moms and their babies to passing landmark legislation to end human trafficking, combat the opioid epidemic, protect consumer rights and strengthen our election security, Amy has the track record needed to build a better future for our country. That’s how she’s passed more than 100 bills into law as lead Democrat and was named the most effective Democratic Senator.

America needs a candidate who can beat Donald Trump and get our country back on the path to progress with an ambitious, optimistic economic agenda. Amy has won every race, in every place, everywhere, every time — including places President Trump won by more than 20 points. And that’s why she released a plan outlining the concrete steps she will take in her first 100 days as president to improve health care, combat climate change, pursue economic justice and shared prosperity, and build a stronger democracy and safer world.

As president, Amy will look people in the eye, tell them the truth and govern with integrity. If you think it’s time America had a president who does the same, join Amy to stand up to Donald Trump and say that people matter.

https://amyklobuchar.com

https://t.co/yFENnucUIX

2020 Census Jobs

February 5, 2020

The U.S. Census Bureau is recruiting to fill hundreds of thousands of temporary positions across the country to assist with the 2020 Census count.

 

 

?

January 19, 2020

 

Tuesday, November 3, 2020

January 8, 2020

299 days.

 

January 7, 2020

David & Seth

January 2, 2020

Seth Godin:

A Box of Infinity

It’s hard to look right at it.

The possibility that lies before us, the chance to connect, to lead, to be heard–it’s bigger than it’s ever been.

Tempting indeed to avert your eyes, because staring into infinity means embracing just how small we feel. We avert our eyes because to realize how much potential we have to contribute puts us on the hook.

But whether we ignore it or not, the infinity of possibility remains.

Dance with it.

︶⁀°• •° ⁀︶

David Whyte:

Hiding

It’s a way of staying alive. Hiding is a way of holding ourselves until we are ready to come into the light. Hiding is one of the brilliant and virtuoso practices of almost eery part of the natural world: the protective quiet of an icy northern landscape, the head but of a future summer rose, the snowbound internal pulse of the hibernating bear. Hiding is underestimated. We are hidden by life in our mother’s womb until we grown and ready ourselves for our first appearance in the lighted world; to appear too early in that world is to find ourselves with the immediate necessity for outside intensive care.

Hiding done properly is the internal faithful promise for a proper future emergence, as embryos, as children or even as emerging adults in retreat from the names that have caught us and imprisoned us, often ways where we have been too easily seen and too easily named.

We live in a time of the dissected soul, the immediate disclosure; our thoughts, imaginings and longings exposed to the light too much, too early and too often, our best qualities squeezed to soon into a world already awash with ideas that oppress our sense of self and our sense of others.

What is real is almost always to begin with, hidden, and does not want to be understood by the part of our mind that mistakenly thinks it knows what is happening. What is precious inside us does not care to be known by the mind in ways that diminish its presence.

Hiding is an act of freedom from the misunderstanding of others, especially in the enclosing world of oppressive secret government and private entities, attempting to name us, to anticipate us, to leave us with no place to hide and grow in ways unmanaged by creeping necessity for absolute naming, absolute tracking and absolute control.

Hiding is a bid for independence, from others from mistaken ideas we have about ourselves form an oppressive mistaken wish to keep us completely safe, completely ministered to, and therefore completely managed. Hiding is creative, necessary and beautifully subversive of outside interference and control. Hiding leaves life to itself, to become more of itself. Hiding is the radical independence necessary for our emergence into the light of a proper human future.

2020

January 1, 2020

Begin what? I begin. I have already thus begun a thousand lives.

-Rilke

Whatever today brings, try to make the most of it, making it the best day you can. I hope you will fill the day with many magical moments and grace notes and remember that everywhere, all of us are struggling and striving to do the same. In Emerson’s words we are seeking the divinities that are sitting disguised. Grace notes are multifaceted, rich. They are as scattered as shooting stars, as diverse as the sea and the sky. Some are wise and wonderful; some are intentionally vague and mysterious. Whether they are instructional, specific, questioning, inspiring or just plain fun, pay attention to them and how you react to them each day.

-Alexandra Stoddard

‘In dangerous times like these we have to produce generations of dedicated, courageous, and creative contemplative activists who will join [the conscious collective] to bring radical healing and change to this damaged world, before it’s too late.’

-Fr. Richard Rohr

︶⁀°• •° ⁀︶

“Whatsoever things are true,

Whatsoever things are honest,

Whatsoever things are just,

Whatsoever things are pure,

Whatsoevery things are lovely,

Whatsoever things are of good report:

If there be any virtue,

and if there be any praise,

Think on these things.”

-Philippians 4:8

︶⁀°• •° ⁀︶

Thomas Merton…”literally meditated on paper.”

‘But I do have a past to break with, an accumulation of inertia, waste, wrong, foolishness, rot, junk, a great need of clarification of mindfulness, or rather of no mind…a return to genuine practice, right effort, need to push on to the great doubt. Need for the Spirit. Hang on to the clear light!’

New arts, new sciences, new philosophies, better government, and a high civilization wait on our thoughts.

-Ernest Holmes

In 2020, let us commit to evaporating patriarchy, power, and greed.

‘The influence of the Feminine is responsible for the growth of the Environmental Movement; for the determination of women in every culture to free themselves from their long oppression and encourage their increased participation to healing both psyche and body. It is reflected in the mountain revulsion for our addiction to war; in the engagement of hundreds of thousands of people in the work of helping both the planet and the victims of oppression. These different channel of influence are creating new perspectives on life, new ways of connection that bring together body, soul, mind and spirit. All this is being accelerations by organizations like Avaaz which now has many millions of subscribers.

The recovery of the Feminine invites a reorientation of consciousness: a receptivity not only to the events occurring in the external world but to the long-ignored voice of the Soul. The activation of the Feminine is helping us to relate to the deep cosmic source of our psychic life and draw up the living waters from those depths. This enormous shift challenges every aspect of our beliefs. It immeasurably deepens and broadens our perspective on our presence on this planet. It gives deeper meaning to our lives. It is changing everything.’

-Anne Baring, The dream of the Cosmos a Quest for the Soul

‘The journey in search of soul is difficult and even dangerous because it requires that we relinquish the certainty of what we think we know and what we have been taught for generations to believe. It means surrendering the desire to be in control and opening ourselves to a quest, a path of discovery. Many myths and fairy tales emphasize the need for surrender and trust in the strange non-rational guidance offered by animals or shamans on the quest. As the hero follows their guidance, so the hedge opens, the way unfolds. Following the guidance and wisdom of the instinct is the royal road into the realm of soul.’
-Anne

The Dream of the Cosmos is the story of a multi-layered quest to understand the causes of human suffering and to reconnect with a deeper reality than the one we inhabit in this physical dimension of experience. It seeks to answer the questions: “Who are we?” and “Why are we here, on this planet?” [google books]

 

December 15, 2019

#2020

 

‘…the idea of democracy.’

December 8, 2019

Photograph by James Marabello / Alamy

By

The Impeachment Hearings and the Coming Storm

New Yorker

The madness of the moment lies in looking at how this came to pass, at how many people had to give up on the idea of democracy for things to come to this.

Almost always, I bite my tongue. But, yes, he is that bad, and this is unprecedented, and these acts are impeachable, and, if it seems as though people have been clamoring for his impeachment since he took office, that’s only because he has behaved abominably since he took office. Is abomination impeachable? No. But the abuses of office of which the President now stands accused are the very definition of impeachable.

The madness lies in looking, honestly, at how this came to pass, at how many people had to give up on the idea of democracy for things to come to this. The sadness lies in the recognizing of the unlikelihood of anything getting much better anytime soon, what with the slush and the sleet and the coming storm. A farmer walks across a field, bracing against the wind. Hardness is what’s required to get through a political winter: determination, forbearance, sacrifice, not bitterness but a certain sternness.

 

https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily-comment/the-impeachment-hearings-and-the-coming-storm

Women: The Most Powerful Electorate

November 11, 2019

“Never forget that it only takes one political, economic or religious crisis for women’s rights to be put in jeopardy. Those rights are never to be taken for granted; you must remain vigilant throughout your life.”
-Simone de Beauvoir

AXIOS

A surge of female winners in this week’s state elections — most of them Democrats, and many of them women of color — reflected women’s rising power since the 2016 election, AP’s Sarah Rankin and Sara Burnett report.

  • Why it matters: Tuesday’s results mean women will hold majorities in places like the Boston City Council, long seen by many as a “boys’ club,” and lead communities such as Scranton, Pa., where voters elected the city’s first female mayor just weeks before she’s due to give birth.

In Virginia, Juli Briskman, a cyclist who was fired after she flipped off President Trump’s motorcade, was elected to the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors, representing an area that’s home to one of his golf courses.

  • Briskman said her run-in with Trump inspired her to get involved in politics.
  • “I think this administration has done that for a lot of women,” Briskman, a single mom, told AP.  “They’ve just decided, ‘OK, if someone like this can get elected, … we need to start speaking up and changing it.'”

In Maine, a 23-year-old Somali American woman was elected to the Lewiston City Council, defeating another Democrat and what she described as “internet trolls” who lobbed racist and sexist attacks via social media.

  • GOP women were behind record wins in Mississippi, where 12 women — eight Republicans and four Democrats — won seats in the state Senate. The previous record was nine, set in 2016.

AP

Tuesday was an extension of the blue wave in 2017, when Democrats picked up 15 Virginia House seats, with 11 won by women. The next year, three women in the state defeated incumbent Republicans in the U.S. House.

One of those women, Rep. Abigail Spanberger, said the campaigns in Virginia haven’t just been won by women, but they’ve also been powered by female volunteers and animated by issues women prioritize — such as gun violence prevention and health care.

Spanberger read Tuesday’s results as evidence of the success of centrist, pragmatic politics. She advised Democrats with national ambition to “pay attention.”

“People want us to act, to focus on solving problems, not be the most ideologically pure,” she said. “People are not expecting perfection. But they are expecting you to try.”

DT’s  approval rating among women has been lower than with men throughout his presidency.

Pew Research Center data shows DT’s average approval rating over his first two years in office was 44% among men, compared with 31% among women, a gap in presidential approval wider than for other recent presidents, including Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George H.W. Bush.

“(Women have) just decided, ‘OK, if someone like this can get elected, something is very, very wrong, and we need to start speaking up and changing it.’”

 

We are liberal and conservative.

October 10, 2019

“As we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.”

As I was ushering Marianne into her car, I felt a tap on my shoulder. I turned around to see a middle-aged white woman, in tears, asking what she could do to help. She wanted me to know that had never been much interested in politics, but that she had voted for Trump for his fresh, bold outlook. Now she was feeling buyers’ remorse—and hopelessness.

That’s why, she said, she had driven an hour from her home in Portland, Maine to hear Marianne speak: She had been drawn to the core message of heart, community, and patriotic bridge-building.

“America at its best,” the woman said, “is both liberal and conservative.”

What a profound observation. In fact, it’s what all Marianne supporters appreciate: a thriving democracy embraces divergent viewpoints.

Encounters like this—along with that framed quote—are what drive me, working on this campaign to continue our effort to co-create our America. 

With warm regards—

Hon. Paul Hodes
New Hampshire State Director
Marianne Williamson for President 

#NationalVoterRegistrationDay

September 24, 2019

Make sure you’re registered to vote. Then, ask 5 friends to register. It’s the most important thing we can for our country.

https://www.vote.org

https://supermajority.com

September 22, 2019

 

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