Café News

Cathedral thinking.

April 16, 2019

Greta Thunberg, speaking to Europe’s political leaders ahead of European parliament elections in May on Tuesday, April 16th.

Referring to Monday’s fire at Paris’ Notre Dame Cathedral in her speech, Greta called for “cathedral thinking” to tackle climate change.

“It is still not too late to act. It will take a far-reaching vision, it will take courage, it will take fierce, fierce determination to act now, to lay the foundations where we may not know all the details about how to shape the ceiling,” she said. “In other words it will take cathedral thinking. I ask you to please wake up and make changes required possible.”

[The Guardian]

https://amp.theguardian.com/environment/2019/apr/16/greta-thunberg-urges-eu-leaders-wake-up-climate-change-school-strike-movement?CMP=twt_gu&utm_medium&utm_source=Twitter&__twitter_impression=true&fbclid=IwAR3BY0QakyrtIp_ARG1Hbz1ux51ZxdG3DOJfNMT0C3A6lmAABh-MTDlETn8

Only after the last tree has been cut down,

Only after the last river has been poisoned,

Only after the last fish has been caught,

Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.

– Cree Indian Prophecy


 

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/15/notre-dame-fire-paris-france-cathedral

Our planet.

April 13, 2019

The New Yorker

by, Rachel Riederer

With the Netflix Series “Our Planet,” David Attenborough Delivers an Urgent Message

Our Planet is a departure from David Attenborough’s previous documentaries. It places global climate catastrophe front and center, and treats the problems of climate change and habitat loss with a new urgency. “The longer we leave it, the more difficult it will be to solve the problem,” Attenborough, who is ninety-two, told me over the phone from Washington, where he was going to deliver a speech to the International Monetary Fund. “Eventually, of course, you can’t solve the problems, and the result is chaos.”

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/on-television/with-the-netflix-series-our-planet-david-attenborough-delivers-an-urgent-message

Guns & Suicide

April 9, 2019

CITY LAB

‘A new study finds conclusive evidence that states with stricter gun-control laws have lower rates of both murders and suicides. (Nearly 2/3rds of U.S. gun deaths are suicides.) We covered an earlier study that found that states with higher rates of gun ownership had higher rates of teen suicide. Research by one of us (Richard) has found that states with stricter gun-control laws have fewer gun deaths. And a meta-analysis of more than 130 studies across 10 nations found strong evidence of the same.’

IDAHO

  • Idaho is consistently among the states with the highest suicide rates. In 2016, Idaho had the 8th highest suicide rate in the U.S. with a rate of 20.8, 50% higher than the national average. (The rate is 2017 increased to 22.9%.)

https://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Portals/0/Users/145/93/2193/Fact%20Sheet_September%202018.pdf

THE 3 GUN-CONTROL LAWS THAT WORK BEST IN THE U.S.

‘It’s not just that gun control works—and it does, according to the study—it’s that particular kinds of gun-control measures are significantly more effective than others. In fact, three types of restrictions are most effective, individually and in combination, in reducing the overall homicide rate. They are: universal background checks, bans on violent offenders purchasing guns, and “may-issue” laws (which give police discretion in issuing concealed-carry permits).’

Cindy Pelletier of Alpharetta, Georgia, looks over a semi-automatic handgun Kimber Micro Bel Air, a .380 ACP caliber, during the SHOT (Shooting, Hunting, Outdoor Trade) Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., January 22, 2019. Picture taken January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Steve Marcus – RC11FD810250

‘Certain kinds of gun-control measures have more public support than others. For example, a large majority of Americans support universal background checks, including a whopping 97 percent of people in gun-owning households. Meanwhile, just two-thirds of Americans and roughly half of people in gun-owning households support assault-weapons bans.’

https://www.citylab.com/life/2019/04/gun-control-firearms-law-deaths-shooting-state-data-research/586363/?utm_content=edit-promo&utm_source=twitter&utm_term=2019-04-05T20%3A01%3A17&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=citylab

King of the Surf Guitar

March 18, 2019

From The Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson:

I’m sorry to hear about Dick Dale passing. Dick’s guitar playing was a big influence on all of us, and we covered “Misirlou” on our Surfin’ USA album in ‘63. Love & Mercy to Dick’s family.

Dick Dale, “the King of the Surf Guitar,” has died at the age of 81.

California Rocker first reported that Dale died Sunday. His bassist Sam Bolle confirmed Dale’s death to the Guardian. No cause of death was revealed, but the guitarist suffered from health issues in recent years.

“I can’t stop touring because I will die. I have to raise $3,000 every month to pay for the medical supplies I need to stay alive, and that’s on top of the insurance that I pay for.”

#UniversalHealthcare

Jimi Hendrix, like Dale, would play his Stratocaster left-handed. Eddie Van Halen would later cite Dale and surf music as one of his prime inspirations, with the Van Halen guitarist modeling his method on Dale’s quick-picking. Stevie Ray Vaughan, another disciple, would team with Dale on a cover of the Chantays’ surf classic “Pipeline” in 1986; the rendition would be nominated for Best Rock Instrumental Performance at the 1987 Grammys.

In addition to influencing a generation of guitar gods, Dale enjoyed a resurgence in popularity in the Nineties thanks to the placement of “Miserlou” in Pulp Fiction.

“Dick Dale was truly the King of Surf Guitar. Before the Beach Boys gave this new genre lyrics, Dick Dale was providing the instrumental soundtrack to the surfing experience. He influenced everybody!” Stevie Van Zandt said in a statement.

Rolling Stone

Dick Dale, King of the Surf Guitar, Dead at 81

Environmentalists & the 9th Circuit

March 12, 2019

An environmental group is launching a campaign to defend the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals which has been a target for President Trump. The court hears some of the most important environmental and other cases in our region.

“Well you go to the 9th Circuit and it’s a disgrace and I’m going to put in a major complaint, because you cannot win if you’re us, a case in the 9th Circuit,” he told reporters in November of last year.

Because the 9th Circuit covers much of the Western U.S. it hears a lot of cases about public lands and endangered species. It’s currently considering Juliana vs. United States, the case where kids are suing the federal government for failing to act to combat climate change. The 9th Circuit recently rejected challenges to a 2012 Department of Interior decision to withdraw, for up to 20 years, over one million acres of land near Grand Canyon National Park from new uranium mining claims.

The League of Conservation Voters is launching a campaign to fight for neutral judicial nominees on that court.

“It’s so important that that court remains fair and objective and has qualified judges sitting on it who make decisions that impact our clean air and clean water,” says Ben Driscoll, Judiciary Program Director with the nonprofit.

President Trump has nominees for four out of the five vacant judges seats. Those nominees still have to go before the Senate before being confirmed.

Find reporter Amanda Peacher on Twitter @amandapeacher.

Listen:

https://www.boisestatepublicradio.org/post/trump-eyes-9th-circuit-environmentalists-fight-neutral-nominees

The Middles Class Declines…Again

March 10, 2019

But the billionaires and millionaires…their profits…continue to rise.

AP/AXIOS/NYTimes

More than $30 trillion: That’s the amount of wealth generated by stocks’ 10-year bull run, per the N.Y. Times’ Matt Phillips.

  • “Adjusted for inflation, that is the most created during any bull run on record, edging out the $25 trillion in gains during the epic streak from December 1987 to March 2000, which ended with the bursting of the dot-com bubble.”

The fruits went mostly to the rich, per The Times:

  • The net worth of the wealthiest 10% of American families grew by double-digit %s.
  • Median American family wealth dropped 34%.

Why it matters: “In the past, such episodes of wealth destruction cast long shadows. For much of the 20th century, the financial habits of the American public were heavily influenced by memories of the Great Depression.”

The Uninhabitable Earth

March 6, 2019

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The Uninhabitable Earth hits you like a comet, with an overflow of insanely lyrical prose about our pending Armageddon.”—Andrew Solomon, author of The Noonday Demon

‘David Wallace-Wells is a national fellow at the New America foundation and a columnist and deputy editor at New York magazine. He was previously the deputy editor of The Paris Review. He lives in New York City.’

“This is only a preview of the changes to come.

And they are coming fast.”

Like An Inconvenient Truth and Silent Spring before it, The Uninhabitable Earth is both a meditation on the devastation we have brought upon ourselves and an impassioned call to action. For just as the world was brought to the brink of catastrophe within the span of a lifetime, the responsibility to avoid it now belongs to a single generation. [Amazon]

An immediate and moral responsibility to engage in this conversation…an entry point being Wallace-Wells’ book & podcast, hosted by Chris Hayes. Here’s the link:

A young climate activist, Greta Thunberg, in this piece talks about learning the severity of Climate Change, being inspired by Rosa Parks.

Rolling Stone

The First Time: Climate Activist Greta Thunberg

Stacey, we’re listening.

February 26, 2019

Stacey Abrams is the one politician I can listen to and feel like I can actually breathe. Put her on a ticket. Absolutely, #Senate.

LIVE: The Democratic Response with Stacey Abrams

If you want to get to the heart of the most fundamental question facing the Democratic Party right now – what is the future of the coalition – look no further than Stacey Abrams. Her historic 2018 campaign for Georgia Governor was built around her vision of how to turn out a progressive majority at the ballot box. And though she lost that election, suffice it to say her theory caught the attention of the country. Now, she sits down with Chris Hayes and WITHpod listeners to reflect on that hard-fought campaign against Brian Kemp, her vision for the party, and how she not only delivered but also embodies the Democratic response to DT. Will she run for Senate? For President? Would she go out on a date with Idris Elba? Listen to find out.

Email us at WITHpod@gmail.com

Tweet using #WITHpod

 

 

Emma said no.

LA Times

“In a letter she sent to Skydance management, Emma Thompson acknowledged the complications caused by a star withdrawing from a project. But in the end, she wrote, the questions raised by the John Lasseter hire made it impossible for her to stay in the film.

Thompson declined to comment on her decision, but she made the letter available to The Times. (When contacted, Skydance representatives had no comment.) Here it is, in full.”

As you know, I have pulled out of the production of “Luck” — to be directed by the very wonderful Alessandro Carloni. It feels very odd to me that you and your company would consider hiring someone with Mr. Lasseter’s pattern of misconduct given the present climate in which people with the kind of power that you have can reasonably be expected to step up to the plate.

I realise that the situation — involving as it does many human beings — is complicated. However these are the questions I would like to ask:

  • If a man has been touching women inappropriately for decades, why would a woman want to work for him if the only reason he’s not touching them inappropriately now is that it says in his contract that he must behave “professionally”?
  • If a man has made women at his companies feel undervalued and disrespected for decades, why should the women at his new company think that any respect he shows them is anything other than an act that he’s required to perform by his coach, his therapist and his employment agreement? The message seems to be, “I am learning to feel respect for women so please be patient while I work on it. It’s not easy.”
  • Much has been said about giving John Lasseter a “second chance.” But he is presumably being paid millions of dollars to receive that second chance. How much money are the employees at Skydance being paid to GIVE him that second chance?
  • If John Lasseter started his own company, then every employee would have been given the opportunity to choose whether or not to give him a second chance. But any Skydance employees who don’t want to give him a second chance have to stay and be uncomfortable or lose their jobs. Shouldn’t it be John Lasseter who has to lose HIS job if the employees don’t want to give him a second chance?
  • Skydance has revealed that no women received settlements from Pixar or Disney as a result of being harassed by John Lasseter. But given all the abuse that’s been heaped on women who have come forward to make accusations against powerful men, do we really think that no settlements means that there was no harassment or no hostile work environment? Are we supposed to feel comforted that women who feel that their careers were derailed by working for Lasseter DIDN’T receive money?

I hope these queries make the level of my discomfort understandable. I regret having to step away because I love Alessandro so much and think he is an incredibly creative director. But I can only do what feels right during these difficult times of transition and collective consciousness raising.

I am well aware that centuries of entitlement to women’s bodies whether they like it or not is not going to change overnight. Or in a year. But I am also aware that if people who have spoken out — like me — do not take this sort of a stand then things are very unlikely to change at anything like the pace required to protect my daughter’s generation.

Yours most sincerely,

Emma Thompson

https://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-mn-emma-thompson-john-lasseter-skydance-20190226-story.html?hootPostID=75b7dde64c4228fb6a496fc2fe82507d

 

 

 

Enough.

February 24, 2019

These destructive entitled men in their silly pink hats.

“Power corrupts, and societal structures have so far granted men the most power.”

 

“Debs! Debs! Debs!”

February 17, 2019

“What is socialism? Merely Christianity in action. It recognizes the equality in men.”

The New Yorker

Eugene V. Debs and the Endurance of Socialism/Half man, half myth, Debs 
turned a radical creed into a deeply American one.

Every man who worked on the American railroad in the last decades of the nineteenth century became, of necessity, a scholar of the relations between the rich and the poor, the haves and the have-nots, the masters and the slaves, the riders and the ridden upon. No student of this subject is more important to American history than Debs, half man, half myth, who founded the American Railway Union, turned that into the Social Democratic Party, and ran for President of the United States five times, including once from prison.

Debs was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, in 1855, seven years after Marx and Engels published “The Communist Manifesto.

In a new book, “Eugene V. Debs: A Graphic Biography” (Verso), drawn by Noah Van Sciver and written by Paul Buhle and Steve Max, Debs looks like an R. Crumb character, though not so bedraggled and neurotic.

People could listen to him talk for hours. “Debs! Debs! Debs!” they’d cry, when his train pulled into a station. Crowds massed to hear him by the tens of thousands. But even though Debs lived until 1926, well into the age of archival sound, no one has ever found a recording of his voice. When Nick Salvatore wrote, in his comprehensive biography, “Eugene V. Debs: Citizen and Socialist,” in 1982, “His voice ran a gamut of tones: mock whisper to normal conversation to full stentorian power,” you wonder how he knew. Debs could speak French and German and was raised in the Midwest, so maybe he talked like the Ohio-born Clarence Darrow, with a rasp and a drawl. Some of Debs’s early essays and speeches have just been published in the first of six volumes of “The Selected Works of Eugene V. Debs” (Haymarket), edited by Tim Davenport and David Walters. Really, he wasn’t much of a writer. The most delightful way to hear Debs is to listen to a recording made in 1979 by Bernie Sanders, in an audio documentary that he wrote and produced when he was thirty-seven years old and was the director of the American People’s Historical Society, in Burlington, Vermont, two years before he became that city’s mayor. In the documentary—available on YouTube and Spotify—Sanders, the Brooklyn-born son of a Polish Jew, performs parts of Debs’s most famous speeches, sounding, more or less, like Larry David. It is not to be missed.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/02/18/eugene-v-debs-and-the-endurance-of-socialism

“A new kind of left-wing doctrine is emerging,” The Economist writes in its lead article [AXIOS]:

  • 28 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, “socialism is back in fashion.”
  • “In America Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a newly elected congresswoman who calls herself a democratic socialist, has become a sensation even as the growing field of Democratic presidential candidates for 2020 veers left. In Britain Jeremy Corbyn, the hardline leader of the Labour Party, could yet win the keys to 10 Downing Street.”
  • “Whereas politicians on the right have all too often given up the battle of ideas and retreated towards chauvinism and nostalgia, the left has focused on inequality, the environment, and how to vest power in citizens rather than elites.”

“Socialism is storming back because it has formed an incisive critique of what has gone wrong in Western societies.”


“Nation-states, when they form, imagine a past.”

“Nationalism’s largely unpredicted resurgence is sobering,” Foreign Affairs editor Gideon Rose writes in introducing his new cover. 

The advocacy of … nationalism … drove some of the greatest crimes in history. And so the concept became taboo in polite society, in hopes that it might become taboo in practice, as well. Yet now it has come back with a vengeance.

Jill Lepore, Harvard history professor and New Yorker staff writer, concludes in

A New Americanism:

At the close of the Cold War, some commentators concluded that the American experiment had ended in triumph, that the United States had become all the world. But the American experiment had not in fact ended. A nation founded on revolution and universal rights will forever struggle against chaos and the forces of particularism. A nation born in contradiction will forever fight over the meaning of its history.

https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/united-states/2019-02-05/new-americanism-nationalism-jill-lepore

The endurance of nationalism proves that there’s never any shortage of blackguards willing to prop up people’s sense of themselves and their destiny with a tissue of myths and prophecies, prejudices and hatreds, or to empty out old rubbish bags full of festering resentments and calls to violence. When historians abandon the study of the nation, when scholars stop trying to write a common history for a people, nationalism doesn’t die. Instead, it eats liberalism. 

Maybe it’s too late to restore a common history, too late for historians to make a difference. But is there any option other than to try to craft a new American history—one that could foster a new Americanism? 

September 30th, 2019

The Correspondent will launch as your platform for unbreaking news on September 30, 2019.

In order to launch on September 30, we’ll build a team of correspondents that help us understand the world around us. As we start to do that, we want to get a better sense of what you — our 47,000 members — deem the most important developments or topics for them to cover.

We want to know: what development in the world do you consider underreported in the news and worthy of more attention? What do you experience on a daily basis in your work or personal life that should be front page news, but never is?

Some of you already shared your brilliant ideas with us during our crowdfunding campaign. Thank you to everyone who got in touch when we asked this question back in November.

Since then, an additional 30,000 members have joined our movement, so we want to give everyone another opportunity to contribute!

So, what topics and developments would you like The Correspondent to cover? Let us know here. 

We’ll carefully read all your suggestions, and they’ll shape the unbreaking news we create together!

Rob Wijnberg
Founding Editor

thecorrespondent.com

Next year.

February 11, 2019

Remembering a night in 2016 when time became fixed and devastatingly immovable…2020 seemingly impossible. And now five women have declared candidacy for president, one hoping to “heal the heart of our democracy […] a sense of community fractured across our nation worn down by the petty and vicious nature of our politics.” I am hopeful. ❥

~

Star Tribune/Minnesota

Sen. Amy Klobuchar announces presidential bid: ‘I am running for every American, I’m running for you’

Senator will test her hometown brand on the national stage

http://www.startribune.com/senator-amy-klobuchar-s-is-running-for-president-2020-democrat-midwest-minnesota/505633892/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axiosam&stream=top

Team Human

January 29, 2019

City Lights Book Store/San Francisco

“Right now, I’m reading a galley of Ghost Work: How to Stop Silicon Valley from Building a New Global Underclass, by Mary L. Gray and Siddharth Suri.”

What are 3 books you would you never part with?

  1. Robert Anton Wilson’s Cosmic Trigger
  2. Marshall McLuhan’s Understanding Media
  3. The Tanakh

What writers/artists/people do you find the most influential to the writing of this book and/or your writing in general?

David Lynch, Timothy Leary, Aleister Crowley, Karen Armstrong, Marshall McLuhan, Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas, Mircea Eliade, Howard Rheingold, Frances Moore Lappé, Karl Marx, W.E.B. Du Bois, Terence McKenna, Fred Turner, Zeynep Tufekci.

“Find the others. Restore the social connections that make us fully functioning humans, and oppose all conventions, institutions, technologies, and mindsets that keep us apart.

Our values–ideals such as love, connection, justice, distributed prosperity–are not abstract. We have simply lost our capacity to relate to them” (p. 211).

Harnessing wide-ranging research on human evolution, biology, and psychology, Rushkoff shows that when we work together we realize greater happiness, productivity, and peace. If we can find the others who understand this fundamental truth and reassert our humanity―together―we can make the world a better place to be human.

[Named one of the “world’s ten most influential intellectuals” by MIT, Douglas Rushkoff is an author, media theorist, professor, and documentarian who studies human autonomy in a digital age.]

Rushkoff’s talk at City Lights Book Store in San Francisco…1.29.19…will be recorded for a future podcast.


 

Poverty is real and persuasive.

CBS

Aimee Picchi

40% of Americans only one missed paycheck away from poverty.

“This is not a problem of just low-income people — this is a problem of middle-class people and even people with higher income without enough savings,” Wiedrich said. “If they hit a shock, they are in the same boat. Maybe they can’t pay their mortgage” or must make choices about what bills to pay.

Another financial challenge that keeps many people the edge is housing. Homes are becoming less affordable across the country, with median home values now early four times higher than median incomes — experts generally advise against spending more than three times income on housing. Similarly, half of all renters say they spend more than a third of their income on rent and utilities.

Millions of middle-class Americans are just one missed paychecks away from poverty, with 4 of 10 considered “liquid-asset poor,” or without enough money socked away to cope with even a sudden disruption in income.

Despite the lowest unemployment rate in decades and solid economic growth, many Americans are on thin financial ice, Prosperity Now found. Minority households are particularly lagging on key measures such as income and wealth, the study found. Across the board, more than 1 in 10 American households fell behind in their bills in the last year, a signal that many are struggling with rising costs and stagnant incomes.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/40-of-americans-one-step-from-poverty-if-they-miss-a-paycheck/


Souther Poverty Law Center/Press-Citizen.com

“Almost 1,400 people drove with suspended/revoked licenses from 2016-2019 in Iowa, 1 of 40+ states that suspends licenses for nonpayment of fees & fines. If people can’t drop their kids off at school or drive to work, how are they supposed to pay the bills?

License suspensions have a greater impact on low-income families.

Unpaid traffic tickets can be used as a reason to suspend someone’s license in more than 40 states, including Iowa (and 40 other states). Court debt includes all unpaid fines, penalties, court costs, fees, criminal surcharges, victim restitution, court-appointed attorney fees, among other items.”

https://www.press-citizen.com/story/news/2019/01/25/license-suspensions-have-greater-impact-low-income-families/2656541002/


NPR/Fresh Air

Terry Gross

“While raising her young daughter as a single mother, Stephanie Land cleaned houses through an agency to scrape by. It was back-aching work and the pay — $8.55 an hour to start, $9.25 an hour two years in — just wasn’t enough.

Land, who had left an abusive relationship, lived for a time in a homeless shelter with her daughter. She supplemented her housecleaning income with government assistance, at one point accruing seven types of aid simultaneously, including housing and utility assistance, food stamps, child care grants and Medicaid.

Looking back, she says, “There’s no way that you can work full time [at] minimum wage and have a family. It’s impossible.”

An active challenge for the marginalized, oppressed and poor.

January 24, 2019

“An individual committed to social justice, inspired & frustrated & impassioned by everything. Everything is political. To think otherwise is a luxury. If you don’t stand for something, you will fall for everything.”

-Anwar Omeish (From the book A Nation of Nations/A Great American Immigration Story (2015), by Tom Gjelten

‘Nearly 40 years after some prominent evangelical Christians organized a Moral Majority movement to promote a conservative political agenda, a comparable effort by liberal religious leaders is coalescing in support of immigrant rights, universal health care, LGBTQ rights and racial justice.
“We believe that faith has a critical role to play in shaping public policies and influencing decisionmakers,” says the Rev. Jennifer Butler, an ordained Presbyterian minister and founder of the group Faith in Public Life. “Our moral values speak to the kinds of just laws that we ought to have.”
Her group, part of what could be considered a religious left, says it has mobilized nearly 50,000 local clergy and faith leaders, with on-the-ground operations in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Ohio. Butler founded the organization in 2005 with a precedent in mind: It was religious leaders who drove the abolitionist movement in the 19th century and the civil rights movement in the 20th century.

“To me, Jesus talked about reaching out to the poor, reaching out to the marginalized, reaching out to the oppressed,” says Tara Agnew Harris, 41, who worships at Myers Park Baptist Church in Charlotte, N.C.

“Sometimes, I feel that traditional Christian beliefs have been hijacked,” she says. “I think many people in the United States, when they hear about ‘Christian beliefs,’ they think it has something to do with a certain fundamentalist mindset.”

“The way that I personally interpret my Christian faith and my own Christian walk,” she says, “is that it’s an active challenge. [It’s about] how I can make a difference in the lives of others.”

“We’re working with Muslims and Jews and Sikhs and every sort of faith group,” Butler says. “We all have the same core values in mind, which is that everybody is created in the image of God, and we need to love our neighbors as we love ourselves.”

It was religious leaders who drove the abolitionist movement in the 19th century and the civil rights movement in the 20th century.

“I think religion helps people understand who they should be,” Butler says.’

“The nation is in need of “moral defibrillators” to work on its weak heart.”

-Rev. Dr. William Barber

https://www.npr.org/2019/01/24/684435743/provoked-by-trump-the-religious-left-is-finding-its-voice?sc=tw

Will CEO’s save society?

January 21, 2019

[Full page ad placed in the Washington Post over the weekend.]

~

The Delta Airlines Foundation provides a grant to open Atlanta’s Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park for the MLK holiday since the government shutdown.

“Without the assistance provided by The Delta Air Lines Foundation, it would have remained closed during the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend.”

The reopening comes as the civil rights leader’s family and fans celebrate what would have been King’s 90th birthday. And because of the grant, those celebrations and remembrances can now include visits to the home where King was born and his longtime church.

The 35-acre park, which draws more than 670,000 visitors to Atlanta’s Sweet Auburn neighborhood each year, reopened Saturday. With an $83,500 grant from Delta and money from National Park Service recreation fees, it now has enough funds to operate until Feb. 3.

The contributions are coming from businesses, groups and states. New York is paying to operate the Statue of Liberty National Monument, for instance, and Utah’s tourism office is paying to keep visitor services running at the Arches, Bryce Canyon, and Zion national parks. And in Yellowstone National Park, snowy roads are being groomed thanks to money from Xanterra Parks & Resorts.

https://www.npr.org/2019/01/21/687103456/martin-luther-king-jr-national-park-reopens-for-holiday-thanks-to-a-private-gran

~

Patagonia’s Action Works

For almost 40 years, Patagonia has supported grassroots activists working to find solutions to the environmental crisis. But in this time of unprecedented threats, it’s often hard to know the best way to get involved. That’s why we’re connecting individuals with our grantees, to take action on the most pressing issues facing the world today. We built Patagonia Action Works to connect committed individuals to organizations working on environmental issues in the same community. It’s now possible for anyone to discover and connect with environmental action groups and get involved with the work they do.

Learn more at: patagonia.com/actionworks

~

AXIOS

There’s more pressure on CEOs than ever to address complicated issues facing society, and those that don’t embrace the opportunity could find themselves dealing with frustrated employees and customers.

  • A loss of trust in traditional leaders, like government officials and journalists, is pushing people to develop more trusted relationships at work and with their employers, according to Edelman’s 2019 Trust Barometer survey.

  • Why it matters: This crucial shift in the employee-employer relationship creates new opportunities for CEOs and corporate executives to rebuild societal trust. But it also puts an enormous responsibility on them to address complicated issues, from civic inequality to gun control.

Over three fourths (76%) of the respondents from the latest edition of Edelman’s annual Trust Barometer survey say CEOs should take the lead on change rather than waiting for government to impose it, up 11 points from last year.

  • A majority think CEOs can create positive change in issues like equal pay, prejudice and discrimination, training for the jobs of tomorrow and the environment.

  • Nearly three fourths (71%) of employees agree that it’s critically important for their CEO to respond to challenges, like industry issues (how automation will change jobs), political events (how elections will impact companies), and national crises.

Specific tactics can help CEOs rebuild trust, the study says:

  • Leading change at the local level by solving problems in the communities in which they operate.

  • Enlisting employees to have a voice regarding certain issues and empowering them to use it.

  • Showing commitment to issues inside and outside the organization through philanthropy or workplace trainings.


The 2019 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals that trust has changed profoundly in the past year—people have shifted their trust to the relationships within their control, most notably their employers. Globally, 75 percent of people trust “my employer” to do what is right, significantly more than NGOs (57 percent), business (56 percent) and media (47 percent).

Despite the divergence in trust between the informed public and mass population the world is united on one front—all share an urgent desire for change. Only one in five feels that the system is working for them, with nearly half of the mass population believing that the system is failing them.

In conjunction with pessimism and worry, there is a growing move toward engagement and action. In 2019, engagement with the news surged by 22 points; 40 percent not only consume news once a week or more, but they also routinely amplify it. But people are encountering roadblocks in their quest for facts, with 73 percent worried about fake news being used as a weapon.

https://www.edelman.com/trust-barometer?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axiosam&stream=top

“Really, really great.”

January 20, 2019


Nathan Philips, Omaha Nation, Vietnam Veteran:

“I heard, I heard them saying, ‘Build that wall, build that wall.’ You know, this is indigenous land, we’re not supposed to have walls here, we never did, for a millennium, before anyone came here we never had walls, we never had a prison. You know, we always took care of our elders, we took care of our children, we always provided for them, you know. We taught them right from wrong. I wish I could see that energy of those young men, put that energy into, you know, to make this country really, really great, you know. Helping those that are hungry.”


A story about Nathan from 2008.

https://newsmaven.io/indiancountrytoday/archive/american-indian-veterans-honored-annually-at-arlington-national-cemetery-tMOxOLqrJU6Ux9hZvXAzYQ/

Updated 1.21.19

An event captured on tape, obviously cruel in nature, is now being polarized onto a political side, those who wear red hats, and those who do not. It isn’t the act, right or wrong being judged, it is the ideology. It is clear how this young student was treating a native elder, as were his schoolmates…long or short version. And justice, again, belongs to those who can afford it, including hiring the services of a PR firm to spin what we can plainly see.

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” –MLK

Just got real in Idaho.

January 16, 2019

Little on Climate Change: “It’s a Big Deal”

“Climate change is real,” Little said.“Climate’s changed, there is no question about it,” Little said. “We’ve just gotta figure out how to cope with it and we gotta slow it down. Now, reversing it is going to be a big darn job, if 90 percent of the scientists are right. … The rate of change, we can make a change in. But it’s a big deal.”

“Actually, we can do it by regulation, but a lot of it takes place from the market.” He said, “Bankers are inclined by their very nature to be risk-averse,” and over time, they’ll be more likely to finance something “that’s going to have a smaller carbon footprint, vs. something that’s going to have a bigger carbon footprint.”

“The ultimate solution is we want to have things that keep the air cleaner and produce less carbon,” Little declared.

He noted that back when Idaho did its energy plan, people thought it was a stretch to move Idaho to 20 percent renewable energy not counting hydro, but it happened.

“Climate change is real,” Little said. “I’m old enough that I remember feeding cows all winter long in deep snow, and I go to the ranch now and talk, ‘You wimpy guys, boy, back in the old days when I was a kid, we had winters.’ And there are other things. These ecosystems are changing.”

Little said even the microbes in the soil are changing, altering how they take in oxygen. “So when we do a range project, you’ve got to make that to where it’s changing for a different climate type. The silviculturists will tell you, because of the changing climate, the number of trees, the species of trees, the mix of trees, it’s all changing. … You’ve gotta adapt to it.”

https://www.idahopress.com/news/state/gov-little-climate-change-is-real-must-be-reversed/article_61ed12b3-5c38-50f2-b8cb-68f7cd6bcdb1.html

Clean Web Design