J O M O ❁

May 21, 2019

‘I don’t know about you, but every time I pick up my phone or open up on Twitter, it seems the world is going the wrong way. But when I put down my phone to play with my kids, go for a walk in the neighborhood, or spend time with friends

 

I’m reminded how wonderful and mysterious life really is.”

-Christine Crook, Author & Founder of The Joy of Missing Out

 

 

democratic (small d) communities

May 20, 2019

A. Philip Randolph organized the March on Washington where Dr. King gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. He was a civil rights activist, a labor organizer, and instrumental to desegregating the military. 

Hailey, Idaho ArborFest 2019

May 19, 2019

Audio clip features Hailey’s Tree Committee (HTC) proclamation given by city council president Martha Burke and HTC chair Linda Ries. For additional photos from Hailey’s ArborFest Saturday, May 18th, visit Dayle’s Community Cafe on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Dayles-Community-Cafe-1412473502400633/

 

 

Thoughts and meditations.

The flower doesn’t dream of the bee. It blossoms and the bee comes.

-Mark Nepo

It is the tending of our own souls that invites the natural process of love to begin. I remember my very first tumble into love. I found such comfort there that, like Narcissus, I became lost in how everything other than my pain was reflected in his beauty. All the while, I was addicting my own worth, empowering him as the key to my sense of joy.

If I have learned anything through the years, it is that, though we discover and experience joy with others, our capacity for joy is carried like a pod of nectar into our very own being. I now believe that our deepest vocation is to  root ourselves enough in this life that we can open our hearts to attract others. In other words, in being so thoroughly who we are, an inner essence is released that calls others to experience our personal light.

It seems the very job of being is to ready us for such love.

In this way, the Universe continues through the unexpected coming together of blossomed souls.

So if you can, give up the want of another and be who you are, and more than not, love will come at the precise moment you are simply in love with you. [Nepo]

Identify one trait makes you feel good about who are are: your laugh, your simile, your ability to listen, or the sound of your voice.

Notice how this effects others.

These small moments are the beginnings of love. They do not yet have definition.

Take a moment. Give thanks for your small goodness and for the potential love of others.


A hunger drives us.

We want to contain it all in our naked hands,

our bribing sense, our speechless hearts.

We want to become it, or offer it-but to whom?

We could hold it forever-but, after all,

what can we keep?

Not the beholding, so slow to learn.

Not anything that has happened here.

Nothing.

There are hurts. And, always, the hardships.

And there’s the long knowing of love-all of it

unsayable.

Later,

amidst the stars,

we will see: these are better unsaid.

-Rainer Maria Rilke, from the Ninth Duino Elegy


Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle. 

-Plato

Science of Mind/Ernest Holmes:

This was the Christ speaking, the son begotten of the only Father-the Son of God. Humble in his humanity, compassionate in his tenderness, understand the frailties of the human mind, he let the Great Spirit speak through him, in words of love and sympathy. He proclaimed his divinity through his humanity and taught that all men are brothers.

Rev. Dr. David Goldberg:

The Sanskrit word karuna is translated as compassion, which means active sympathy or the willingness to bear the pain of others. Closely related to karuna is metta, loving kindness.

It’s important to remember also that genuine compassion is rooted in prajna or wisdom. Prajna is the realization that the separate self is an illusion. This takes us back to not attaching our egos to what we do, expecting to be thanked or rewarded.

In Essence of the Heart Sutra, His Holiness the Dalai Lama writes, “According to Buddhism, compassion is an aspiration, a state of mind, wanting others to be free from suffering. It’s not passive-it’s not empty alone-but rather an empathetic altruism that actively strives to free others from suffering. Genuine compassion must have both wisdom and loving kindness. That is to say, one must understand the nature of the suffering from which we wish to free others (this is wisdom), and one must experience deep intimacy and empathy with other sentient beings (this is loving kindness). [Right Action and Compassion, Barbara O’Brien, April 2018]

 

 

Only time for loving.

May 17, 2019

Mark Twain, looking back on his life:

“There isn’t time so brief is life for bickering, apologies, heart-burnings, calling to account there is only time for loving, but in an instant, so to speak, for that.” [1910]

 

Rilke:

“Brother body is poor…that means we must be rich for him.

He was often the rich one; so may he be forgiven

for the meanness of his wretched moments.

Then, when he acts as though he barely knows us,

may he be gently reminded of all that has been shared.

Of course, we are not one but two solitaries:

our consciousness and he.

But how much we have to thank each other for,

as friends do! And illness reminds us:

friendship demands a lot.” [Written between 1908 and 1923.]

 

Thomas Merton (insert medium of choice):

“I am certainly no judge of television, since I have never watched it. All I know is that there is a sufficiently general agreement, among men whose judgement I respect, that commercial television is degraded, meretricious, and absurd. Certainly, it would seem that TV could become a kind of unnatural surrogate for contemplation: a completely inert subjection to vulgar images, a descent to a sub-natural passivity rather than an ascent to a supremely active passivity in understanding and love. It would seem that television should be used with extreme care and discrimination by anyone who might hope to take interior life seriously. [1961]

 

75-Year Study: “Good relationships keep us happier and healthier.”

 

Maria Popova/BrainPickings

“The good life is one inspired by love and guided by knowledge.”

Bertrand Russell

“The Study of Adult Development at the Harvard Medical School, better known as the Grant Study — the longest-running study of human happiness. Beginning in 1938 as a counterpoint to the disease model of medicine, the ongoing research set out to illuminate the conditions that enhance wellbeing by following the lives of 268 healthy sophomores from the Harvard classes between 1939 and 1944. It was a project revolutionary in both ambition and impact, nothing like it done before or since.

[…]

Little progress had been made since Walt Whitman’s prescient case for the grossly underserved human factors in healthcare and the question of what makes for a good life was cautiously left to philosophy. It’s hard for the modern mind to grasp just how daring it was for physicians to attempt to address it.

But that’s precisely what the Harvard team did. There are, of course, glaring limitations to the study — ones that tell the lamentable story of our cultural history: the original subjects were privileged white men. Nonetheless, the findings furnish invaluable insight into the core dimensions of human happiness and life satisfaction: who lives to ninety and why, what predicts self-actualization and career success, how the interplay of nature and nurture shapes who we become.”

“In this illuminating TED talk, Harvard psychologist and Grant Study director Robert Waldinger — the latest of four generations of scientists working on the project — shares what this unprecedented study has revealed, with the unflinching solidity of 75 years of data, about the building blocks of happiness, longevity, and the meaningful life.”

https://www.brainpickings.org/?s=harvard+happiness+study

#2020

“This campaign to establish a U.S. Department of Peace is the first step in dismantling our systemically entrenched perpetuation of violence. And it is critical.” -Marianne Williamson

 

 

Dialogue, Common Sense, and We the People

Idaho Matters/Fri. May 17th: deep & necessary dialogue dive on civil discourse with Keith Allred, ED for the Institute, advisory board members Walt Minnick & former Gov. Butch Otter. If you missed it, listen tonight at 8, or follow audio links.

Today, the Institute is creating 50 advisory boards to be positioned in each state. Idaho is the first state to establish such a board.

Forner Idaho Gov. Butch Otter, right, joins with Keith Allred, center, and Walt Minnick in a campaign to bring civil discourse back to politics in Idaho. Photo: 

“Joining forces to tackle the incivility and partisanship plaguing national politics.”

Idaho Statesman

BY CYNTHIA SEWELL

Tired of political incivility? So are Butch Otter & Walt Minnick, and they hope you can help

Keith Allred , who challenged Butch Otter for governor in the 2010 election, is the new director of The National Institute for Civil Discourse, which was formed following the 2011 shooting of then-U.S. Rep. Gabby Giffords. The organization’s mission addressing the incivility and dysfunction in American life, and repairing American democracy.

“Part of what has gone wrong, as the parties become more polarized, is they are not picking issues in D.C. right now for the sake of solving them, they are trying to find the best club to beat up on each other with,” Allred said.

“If we are holding our breath waiting for the two parties to solve this current civility crisis, we are going to be disappointed,” he added.

Allred sees the solution: The American people to step up.

https://www.idahostatesman.com/news/politics-government/state-politics/article230399129.html

“An unprecedented partisan rift between the major political parties makes our efforts to move past partisanship more important than ever.”

For general interest and to get involved individually, or as community, follow the link: https://www.commonsenseamerican.org

And still we rise. Everyday. We must.

 

Miss Alice Smith, Miss S. J. de Crasse and Miss G. H. Halleran selling the Suffragist in Boston.

#2020

It’s time.

 

Seth’s Seven

May 16, 2019

  • Identity

  • Axiomatic

  • Historic

  • Experimental

  • Experimental

  • Experience

  • Cultural

“A truth is a useful, reliable statement of how the world is. You can ignore it, but it will cost you, because the world won’t work the way you hope it will. You can dislike the truth, but pretending it isn’t true isn’t an effective way to accomplish your goals or to further our culture.

Most of the kinds of truth we experience are about the past and the present, and these are the easiest to see and confirm, but there are also truths about cause and effect.

Identity is the truth of description. A circle is round because we define a circle as round. You can say, “a circle is rectangular in shape,” and all you’ve done is confused us. Words only work because we agree on what they mean.

Demagogues often play with the identity of words, as it distracts us.

Axiomatic truth is truth about the system. The Peano axioms, for example, define the rules of arithmetic. They are demonstrably true and the system is based on these truths. Einstein derived his theories of special and general relativity with a pad of paper, not with an experiment (though the experiments that followed have demonstrated that his assertions were in fact true.)

There were loud voices in mid-century Germany who said that Einstein’s work couldn’t be true because of his heritage, and many others who mis-described his work and then decried that version of it, but neither approach changed the ultimate truth of his argument.

Axiomatic truth, like most other truths, doesn’t care whether you understand it or believe it or not. It’s still true.

Historic truth is an event that actually happened. We know it happened because it left behind evidence, witnesses and other proof.

Experimental truth may not have the clear conceptual underpinnings of axiomatic truth, but it holds up to scrutiny. The world is millions of years old. Every experiment consistently demonstrates this. Experimental truth can also give us a road map to the future. Vaccines do not cause autism. The world is not flat. The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising.

If you want to challenge an experimental truth, the only response is to do a better experiment, make it replicable and show your work.

Personal experience truth is the truth that’s up to you. How you reacted to what happened can only be seen and reported by you.

And finally, consider cultural truth, and this is the truth that can change. This is the truth of, “people like us do things like this.” Which is true, until it’s not. And then people like us do something else.”

-Seth Godin

https://seths.blog

Studio 1A listens to Marianne.

May 15, 2019

FDR: “The presidency is not merely an administrative office, that’s the least of it. It is preeminently a place of moral leadership.”

Foresight 2020: Marianne Williamson

“There are 22 Democratic candidates running for president in 2020. Marianne Williamson is one of them.

She doesn’t have any previous political experience, but the author and motivational speaker does have a large following on social media and has advised Oprah.

And she’s gaining traction. Williamson recently qualified for the first Democratic debate by garnering at least 65,000 individual campaign donors.

Speaking to FiveThirtyEight, Williamson’s communications director framed “the unusual nature of Williamson’s candidacy as a strength. “We’re different. We know that and we embrace that.’”

Williamson has made action on climate change a key part of her campaign platform.

Here’s her position, summarized by the PBS NewsHour:

Williamson believes action is needed to address climate change, and she has said she supports appointing a “world-class environmentalist” to head the Environmental Protection Agency. She supports halting all new fossil fuel projects, and restarting the Obama-era Clean Power Plan. Williamson would also place a temporary ban on new oil and gas fracking, and invest in electric vehicle production and high-speed trains.

She also supports reparations for slavery.

When a student asked her about her political experience during a CNN Town Hall here’s how she responded:

You know, the — the Latin root of the word “politeia” doesn’t mean of the government. It means of the people. And I think our political establishment has gotten too far away from the people.

We have a political establishment that doesn’t get to the heart of the matter, doesn’t speak to what’s really wrong. Politicians don’t really get down and talk about what’s really wrong, even though they know it. And because they don’t talk about what’s really wrong, they don’t get to what can really be made really within us./p>

So in a way, for me, I challenge the idea that people whose careers have been entrenched in the same limitations that are endemic to the system that got us into this ditch are the only people we should possibly consider qualified to take us out of the ditch. I challenge that, and that’s why I’m running./p>

We speak to Willamson about her long-shot status, her policy priorities and more.”

Host Joshua Johnson.

https://the1a.org/shows/2019-05-15/a-conversation-with-marianne-williamson

[34:27]

She’s 12. She’s a journalist. And she’s remarkable.

12-Year-Old Crime Reporter Gives Commencement Address at West Virginia University Media School

The Daily Beast

Audrey McNamara

“Her speech moved on to some of the journalism lessons she’s learned throughout her young career. Hilde Lysiak reminded graduates to “keep your ledes tight… talk to real people,” and “trust no one.” “And most importantly of all, stay laser focused on the truth,” Lysiak said. “If you do these things, I believe that history will look back on this moment not as the last dark days before the profession of journalism died, but as the new beginning.”

On her Orange Street News website you can read and listen to Hilde Lysiak’s full  commencement speech. Here are a couple of excerpts:

Talk to Real People

Politicians and law enforcement can be great sources of information.

But my best stories never came from a press release — they came from biking down my main street, knocking on doors, and talking to the real people.

Who are the real people?

These are the small business owners. That group of old people who hang out at the coffee shop. Or just that nice neighbor man who is raking leaves.

It is here, buried in the nosey lady next door or at the church dinner, where the real nuggets of gold can be found.

Real people have real stories.

And if you take the time to listen, you would be amazed at what the real everyday people know.

[…]

Look — readers are smart. More often than not when given the right facts they will come to the right conclusions.

That’s the power of the truth. The power of facts.

And THAT is the REAL super power of a reporter.

Which leads me to my next point —

9) Don’t Mix Politics and Reporting —

Look — I believe the future has never been brighter for reporters.

Think about it. Has there ever been a time when more people wanted or needed the news more than at THIS very moment right now?

Because of the internet, people from all around the world can access information anytime and anywhere and all from the screen of their smartphone.

This isn’t a good thing.

This is a great thing.

Each one of these people is a potential subscriber to the Orange Street News.

Oh but I know what the skeptics all say, that newspapers might get online readers, but they don’t make money anymore.

To answer that claim, I’d like to point them to the only newspaper that exclusively serves the people of Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania.

I’m proud to say that the newspaper I’m the publisher of, the Orange Street News, DOES make a profit. And I do this while also publishing all my stories online for free and without accepting paid a single dollar in advertising. In fact, my print subscribers are enough for me to pay for all of my expenses including printing along with a few upgrades.

Full speech:

Orange Street News

About The Orange Street News

Facing risk, again.

Mark Nepo:

When resisting the flow of inner events suddenly feels more hurtful than leaping toward the unknown.

Yet no one can tell us when to leap.

There is no authority to bless our need to enter life but the God within.

As spirits in bodily form, we have the chance to tighten and bloom more than once. But even spirits, if turned in on themselves enough, may grow accustomed to being closed.

Unlike roses, however, the human chamber can be shut down for years, and still, it takes but one break from the true center and we will flower.

It has always amazed and humbled me how the risk to bloom can seem so insurmountable before hand and so inevitably freeing once the threshold of suffering is crossed.

We can flower in an instant, as soon as the pain of not flowering and not loving become greater than our fear.

Strangely true.

The New Yorker

 

Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; truth isn’t.

-Mark Twain

 

 

Right action.

May 13, 2019

The Vietnamese Zen teacher Thich Nhat Hanh said, “The basis of Right Action is to do everything in mindfulness.” He teaches Five Mindfulness Trainings:

  • The first training involves respecting life. In awareness of the suffering caused by the destruction of life, we work to protect all living things and this planet that sustains life.
  • The second training involves generosity. We give freely of our time and resources where they are needed, without hoarding things we don’t need. We do not exploit other people or resources for our own gain. We act to promote social justice and well-being for everyone.
  • The third training involves sexuality and avoiding sexual misconduct. In awareness of the pain caused by sexual misconduct, we honor commitments and also act when we can to protect others from sexual exploitation.
  • The fourth training involves loving speech and deep listening. This means avoiding language that causes enmity and discord. Through deep listening to others, we tear down the barriers that separate us.
  • The fifth training involves what we consume. This includes nourishing ourselves and others with healthful food and avoiding intoxicants. It also involves what books we read or what television programs we watch. Entertainments that are addictive or cause agitation might best be avoided.

The importance of compassion in Buddhism cannot be overstated. The Sanskrit word that is translated as “compassion” is Karuna, which means “active sympathy” or the willingness to bear the pain of others. Closely related to Karuna is Metta, ‘loving kindness.’

Five minute mindfulness meditation:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGFog-OuFDM

 

 

Supreme Blessedness

May 11, 2019

 

In the end we will hear what we are: 

The orchard or the road leading past.

-Rilke

“Prayer is a perspective from which to behold, from which to respond to, the challenges we face. (Wo)man in prayer does not seek to impose personal life upon God; (s)he seeks to impose God’s will and mercy upon self. Prayer is necessary to make us aware of our failures, backsliding, transgressions, sins.

To pray is to open a door, where both God and soul may enter. Prayer is arrival, for Him and for us. To pray is to overcome distance, to shatter screens, to render obliquities straight, to heal the break between God and world.

A dreadful oblivion prevails in the world. The world has forgotten what it means to be human. The gap is widening, the abyss is within the self.”

-Abraham Joshua Heschel


Beatitudes of Spirit

“Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they who mourn,
for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the meek,
for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness,
for they shall be satisfied.

Blessed are the merciful,
for they shall obtain mercy.

Blessed are the pure of heart,
for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers,
for they shall be called children of God.

Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.”

-Gospel of St. Matthew 5:3-10

(S)He’s a verb.

May 10, 2019

At the Trinitarian level, God is a verb more than a noun, God is a flow more than a substance, God is an experience more than a deity sitting on a throne. And we live naturally inside that flow of love—if we do not resist it.

Everything is attracted to everything: life is attracted to life; love is attracted to love; God in you is attracted to God in everyone and everything else. This is what it means for everything to be created in the image of God (Genesis 1:26-27). 

Once we allow the entire universe to become alive for us, we are living in an enchanted world. Nothing is meaningless; nothing can be dismissed. It’s all whirling with the same beauty, the same radiance. In fact, if I could name the Big Bang in my own language, I’d call it the Great Radiance.

The inner radiance of God started radiating at least 13.8 billion years ago. We must realize that we are the continuation of that radiance in our small segment of time on Earth. We can either allow it and let the Trinitarian Flow flow through us or we can deny it, which is to deny the divine image.

This is nothing I can prove to you. This is nothing I can make logical or rational. It can only be known experientially in the mystery of love when you surrender yourself to it, when you grant subjectivity or a blessed I-Thou relationship to every other thing—a plant, an animal, a single tree, the big blue sky, “Brother Sun, Sister Moon” [Father Francis of Assisi].

-Richard Rohr, Center for Action & Contemplation

It was Cat. Not Rod. ❀


Rolling Stone

Massive Woodstock Box Set Planned for August

Massive 38-disc box includes nearly every note of music played during the festival’s three days in 1969 – but assembling old tapes and having musicians sign off 50 years later was a daunting task.

Yeah, but. It’s $799. Although, there’s a guitar strap.

“The box — which will also include a Blu-ray of Michael Wadleigh’s Woodstock movie, a guitar strap and a replica of the original program, among other items — will cost $799. More condensed versions — a 10-disc set and a 3-disc one — will also be available.  In the mega-box, the 38th disc includes various audio flotsam. The “Groesbeek Reel,” named after festival sound recordist Charles Groesbeek, includes comments from random attendees taped by Grosbeak–like, Zax laughs, “this one guy moaning about what a disappointing experience it was and that it was a sell-out. It’s a great slice of real people in the moment reacting to it, which pleases me immensely.”

“Complete performances of the Who, Joe Cocker, Sly and the Family Stone, Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, and others, along with acts who weren’t in the movie or the original Woodstock album, like the Band, the Grateful Dead, Creedence Clearwater Revival and Janis Joplin will be available for the first time. The tracks are also arranged chronologically, by day and set times, from Richie Havens’ opening set that August Friday in 1969 to Jimi Hendrix’s festival-closing set on Monday morning. To ease the overwhelming listening experience, each act is accorded its own disc.”

“There have been large boxed sets devoted to particular eras or tours — the Grateful Dead do a great job of that sort of thing — but there’s never, to my knowledge, been an attempt to present a large-scale durational experience of this sort,” says Andy Zax, the Los Angeles producer and archivist who co-produced the set with Steve Woolard. “The Woodstock tapes give us a singular opportunity for a kind of sonic time travel, and my intention is to transport people back to 1969. There aren’t many other concerts you could make this argument about.”

Back to an Even Bigger Garden: Massive Woodstock Box Set Planned for August

 

 

 

Rilke.

May 8, 2019

 

 I live my life in widening circles

that reach out across the world.

I may not complete this last one

but I give myself to it.

 

I circled around God, around the primordial tower.

I’ve been circling for thousands of years

and I still don’t know: am I a falcon,

a storm, or a great song?

 

-The Book of Hours I, 2

 

 

 

New Yorker

 

 

 

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