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    March 20, 2020
    Warren for President

    Dayle,

    Our country is staring down the most difficult challenge we have faced since World War II.

    The coronavirus crisis poses a real threat to our health and economy, and requires a strong response — from our government, but also from each of us.

    It’s natural to feel overwhelmed or powerless at a time like this, but we all have the power to help slow the spread of the coronavirus by taking simple steps. Here are a few pieces of guidance the CDC is giving right now:

      • Wash your hands frequently. Take at least 20 seconds (about how long it takes to sing “Happy Birthday” twice).
      • Avoid touching your face.
      • Cover your mouth when you sneeze or cough.
      • Disinfect things like doorknobs, tables, countertops, and light switches on a daily basis.
    • Stay home as much as possible, and stay away from big crowds, especially if you’re older or have another health condition — like heart or lung disease, or diabetes, or a suppressed immune system — that could make this disease even more dangerous.

    Keep an eye out for more updates from the CDC and from your state and local health departments for updated guidance.

    Even if you’re young and healthy, it is critical that you take all of these steps because they help protect the rest of your community. You’ll reduce the risk of unknowingly passing on the disease to someone else — someone older and less healthy than you who might become seriously ill if they contract the coronavirus. Think of the grandparents, cancer patients, and others out there who are counting on you to help keep them safe.

    Do everything you can to follow these guidelines and take care of yourself. And if you’re able, please take care of your friends, your family, your neighbors, and anyone around you who might need a little extra help — pick up groceries for an older neighbor or order takeout from a local restaurant that is struggling.

    But “social distance” doesn’t mean we should stop communicating. We need one another now more than ever. Keep checking in on people — texting, emailing, calling, video chatting, whatever works, and whatever keeps you talking with the people who make you strong.

    If we all take this seriously, we can limit the number of people who get sick all at the same time, and make it easier for our health system to deliver care to everyone who needs it.

    Taking action as individuals and as local communities is critical, but of course it’s not enough. Our government needs to step up and treat the coronavirus as the public health and economic crisis that it is. I’ve outlined an updated plan to do exactly that, including:

      • Rapidly expand testing;
      • Make sure every American can get the recommended care they need for testing, evaluation, and treatment of coronavirus at no cost;
      • Help hospitals and local leaders expand treatment capacity and supplies of protective gear for our doctors and nurses, and
    • Plugging the hole this will rip through our economy. I’ve proposed a $750 billion stimulus package — including fully paid leave, unemployment insurance boosts, aid to state governments, funding for vaccine development, Social Security benefit increases, and student debt cancellation. Let’s get money in people’s hands so they can stay home if they’re sick but still support the economy from the ground up.

    I’ll keep fighting in Washington to make sure our government takes this pandemic seriously and doesn’t use it as a giveaway to big companies that leaves everyday people behind.

    The Trump administration failed to prepare us for this pandemic. It’s more important than ever for us to each do our part as citizens to support one another.

    Now, I wish I could tell you that this crisis will be over by “X” date or within “Y” days.

    But the reality is we just don’t know.

    For a while, it’s going to be hard. For a lot of people, it’s going to be really hard. But it won’t last forever. And we do know this: When we look out for each other, we make each other stronger. We get through times like these when we fight side by side.

    Elizabeth

    Posted by dayle at 3:38 pm
    Filed in: Café Communication
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