Who am I? Soham. सो ऽहम्

☆☆¸.•*¨*•☆☆•*¨*•.¸¸☆☆

Dearest Gaia:

I open my whole consciousness to the realization that all the power and presence there is surrounds me in an eternal embrace, that the Spirit forever imparts Its own Life to me.

Knowing that I cannot live unto myself alone, but that I am a part of all Life, I gladly and enthusiastically unify with people, conditions, and events, flowing into them with the certain knowledge that I belong to the universe in which I live, that this universe belongs to me, that I am a part of it, necessary to it, one with it.  (We are one.)

-Earnest Holmes/Science of Mind

 

[Translation: Soham…”I am that.”]

#CassiniFinale

Perspective check. That little blue dot with the arrow? That’s us. ☆ “On its final orbit, Cassini plunged into Saturn, fighting to keep its antenna pointed at Earth as it transmits its farewell, a comforting voice narrates as the music swells. In the skies of Saturn, the journey ends, as Cassini becomes part of the planet itself.”

The 3 pillars.

✿Peace

✿Poise

✿Power

Cat.

‘Poverty eradication is definitely a way to peace.’

Yusef Islam

‘One of the most influential singer-songwriters of all time releases his
latest studio album, The Laughing Apple. The Laughing Apple features original songs and covers, though the covers on this album are Yusufs own. He celebrates some of his earliest material, with new presentations of the songs. Conceptually, The Laughing Apple returns to the journey of the Tillerman, as he recalls his travels and life lessons to a younger generation. The album’s cover features Yusufs own illustration, the first time he has designed one of his covers since 1972. Yusuf has drawn additional works of art for each of the 11 songs on The Laughing Apple.’

“Slowly let me tell you a story of a tree
An apple tree,
Once in a summertime garden lived a little apple tree
And the man who owned it wanted it to be picked
So he sent forth to hire me
Well, I’ve traveled the mountains, and I’ve traveled the sea
But a never in my traveling days
Have I ever seen a little apple smile at me!
Laugh, oh laugh a little apple
Autumn is waitin’, you’d better be careful,
For it will bring you down
If it ever sees you wearing a frown
So laugh, laugh a little apple
Well all the apples were hidin’
Frightened that they might be plucked
And everytime that somebody passed
All except that one little apple ducked
Well, I’ve traveled the mountains, and I’ve traveled the sea
But a never in my traveling days
Have I ever seen a little apple smile at me!
Laugh, oh laugh a little apple
Autumn is waitin’, you’d better be careful,
For it will bring you down
If it ever sees you wearing a frown
So laugh, laugh a little apple”

 

Sorrow in Song

DJ Sessions: Remembering 9/11 Through Music

Rita Houston was unable to get to work on Sept. 11, 2001. Blocked by the chaos surrounding the World Trade Center towers in New York, she stayed at home and called into WFUV, where she is a DJ. On that day and in the weeks to follow, listeners made repeated requests for songs that brought them comfort and reminded them of the character of New York.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks about those songs with Houston, now host of the show “The Whole Wide World” and program director at WFUV, which is based in the Bronx at Fordham University.

http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2017/09/08/dj-sessions-september-11-music

Ryan Adams, “New York, New York”

Dar Williams, “Better Things”

Paul Simon, “Was a Sunny Day”

A new paradigm for journalism.

‘When we fiercely hate one another, we make ourselves vulnerable to propaganda and demagogues. Hate blinds people to the truth.’

Jimmy Carter’s advice for President Trump: “Keep the peace, tell the truth”

Rose’s canon.

‘In our age, tragedies are collective & shared across the world, & even in the darkest moments of destruction, unity & love always emerge.’

Let’s bring back:

✿ Emotions

✿ Creativity

✿ Intuition

✿ Justice

✿ Peace

✿ Nature

✿ Love

-Jennifer Rose

@SeeTheRoses

And they waved.

A mural in Tecate, Mexico, sits just beyond a border structure, seen from Tecate, Calif. (AP’s Gregory Bull)

AXIOS
“A photo of a giant toddler stands in Mexico and peers over a steel wall dividing the country from the United States,” AP’S JULIE WATSON writes from Tecate, Mexico:
  • “The boy appears to grip the barrier with his fingers, leaving the impression the entire thing could be toppled with a giggle.”
  • “A French artist who goes by the moniker ‘JR’ erected the cut-out of the boy that stands nearly 65 feet … tall and is meant to prompt discussion of immigration.”
  • Yesterday, “a steady stream of people drove to the remote section of wall near the Tecate border crossing, about 40 miles … southeast of San Diego. Border Patrol agents warned visitors to keep the dirt road clear for their patrols and not pass anything through the fence.”
  • “On the Mexican side, families scrambled down a scrubby hillside to take selfies with the artwork. Children in school uniforms played tag under the scaffolding supporting the photo.”
  • Sentence of the day: “People on each side of the wall waved to each other.”
  • “For artists and activists, the 650 miles of existing wall and fencing between the U.S. and Mexico has long been a blank canvas. Musicians have played simultaneously on both sides. … There have been volleyball games and church services held simultaneously on each side of the border.”
  • “Sections of wall on the Mexican side have been covered with paintings of everything from butterflies to an upside-down American flag.”

Vincent knew.

normality

is a paved

road. it is

comfortable to walk on but

no flowers grow on

it.

-van gogh

Beyond why.

“For so many years, talking about the weather was talking about nothing. Now it really is our survival.”

-Terry Tempest Williams

“Climate change debate is over, now it’s about climate adaptation.”

-Craig Fugate, former director of the Federal Emergency Management

︶⁀°• •° ⁀︶

We must change the narrative. The planet has drastically and rapidly moved beyond the ‘why’ of climate change. The collective needs to desperately and pragmatically admit the climate has indeed ‘changed’. The Earth’s equilibrium has been altered. How do we live in this new ecosystem while protecting, and taking care of each other…and Gaia? The earth needs to know we are trying.


Inside Climate News

Potent Mix of Record Heat and Dryness Fuels Wildfires Across the West

by Georgina Gustin

“These unprecedented extreme events are exactly the types of events that are more likely due to the global warming that’s already occurred.”
“These unprecedented extreme events are exactly the types of events that are more likely due to the global warming that’s already occurred.”

Wildfires burned across hundreds of thousands of acres in the American and Canadian West this week, fueled by scorching temperatures that are breaking heat and fire records across the region.

In California, while temperatures have eased, at least 15 cities have seen record-breaking heat, and the state has experienced its hottest summer on record. San Francisco hit 106 degrees over the weekend, breaking its previous high by 3 degrees. Stoked by unusually high temperatures, fires burned on thousands of acres just outside Los Angeles, while firefighters in Washington, Oregon and Montana battled dozens of blazes across those states.

By the end of the day Tuesday, at least 81 large fires were blazing across 1.5 million acres of the U.S. West, from Colorado to California and north to Washington. Over the Canadian border, British Columbia has already had a record-breaking fire season—and it’s not over yet. Cities including Seattle were shrouded in a smoky fog. In satellite pictures, the smoke could be seen traveling the jet stream and reaching the East Coast.

As firefighters battled the blazes, climate researchers pointed to studies finding that a warmed global atmosphere, with increasingly clear human fingerprints, will continue driving a potent mix of heat and dryness that’s projected to escalate in the West.

“These unprecedented extreme events, on the daily to the seasonal scale, are exactly the types of events that are more likely due to the global warming that’s already occurred,” said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at UCLA. “That’s not so much a future projection, but an observational reality, and that’s something we expect to increase in the future. When we get these extremes, there’s a human fingerprint.”

Swain co-authored a study led by Stanford researcher Noah Diffenbaugh published earlier this year that found human-caused greenhouse gas emissions have increased the chances of extreme heat across more than 80 percent of the globe’s surface area.

“The increased occurrence of severe heat, and the role of global warming on the occurrence of severe heat—that’s already happening,” Diffenbaugh said. “It wouldn’t be scientifically credible to make attribution statements without analyzing the event. That being said, we can see the odds of setting new records based on the global warming that’s already happening.”

While drought and high heat aren’t the only factors making wildfires more intense and frequent—researchers also blame encroaching development into wild areas and certain wildfire management practices—they are key drivers.

Nine of the 10 worst fire seasons in the past 50 years have all happened since 2000, and 2015 was the worst fire season in U.S. history, surpassing 10 million acres for the first time on record. So far this year, wildfires in the U.S. have burned 7.8 million acres, but the fire season is far from over. (In 2015, 8.4 million acreshad burned by early September.) The average fire season is 78 days longer than it was in the 1970s—now nearly seven months—beginning and extending beyond the typical heat of summer. By April of this year, wildfires had scorched more than 2 million acres in the U.S.—nearly the average consumed in entire fire seasons during the 1980s.

Last fall, researchers published the results of a study that found human-induced climate change accounted for about half the observed increase in fuel aridity, or forest dryness, in the western U.S. since 1979 and had nearly doubled the area of the U.S. West affected by forest fires since 1984.

During that same time period, temperatures across the West have risen. Temperatures are projected to rise further—and along with them, the tinderbox conditions that fuel wildfires.

“We know that global warming has already increased the probability of unprecedented high temperatures in the western U.S., including in California,” Diffenbaugh said. “And we know, with high confidence, that continued global warming will continue to intensify those increases.”

A forest fire spread along the Columbia River Gorge on Sept. 5, 2017. Credit: James C. Kling/CC-BY-2.0

The Atlantic

Has Climate Change Intensified 2017’s Western Wildfires?

It was supposed to be a quiet year.

by Robinson Meyer

Last winter, a weak La Niña bloomed across the Pacific. It sent flume after flume of rain to North America and irrigated half the continent. Water penetrated deep into the soil of Western forests, and mammoth snowdrifts stacked up across the Sierra Nevadas. California’s drought ended in the washout.

Yet fires are now raging across the West. More than two dozen named firescurrently burn across Washington and Oregon. More than one million acres have burned in Montana, an area larger than Rhode Island, in the Treasure State’s third-worst fire season on record. And the largest brushfire in the history of Los Angeles currently threatens hundreds of homes in Burbank.

A firefighter battles the Ponderosa Fire east of Oroville, California, in late August. Noah Berger / Reuters

Canada may be experiencing an even worse year for wildfires: 2.86 million acres have burned in British Columbia, the largest area ever recorded in the province.

So what happened? How did a wet Western winter lead to a sky-choking summer?

The answer lies in the summer’s record-breaking heat, say wildfire experts. Days of near-100-degree-Fahrenheit temperatures cooked the Mountain West in early July, and a scorching heat wave lingered over the Pacific Northwest in early August.

“This will become an important year for [anecdotes about] the importance of temperature. Despite the fact that these forests were really soaked down this winter and spring, these heat waves have dried things out enough to promote really large fires,” says Park Williams, a research scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University.

In other words, the weeks of heat that baked the West in July and August were enough to wipe away some of the fire-dampening effect of the winter storms.“The last 60 to 90 days have been exceptionally warm and dry, the perfect recipe for drying out fuels (the one ingredient besides ignitions you need for fire in these systems),” said John Abatzoglou, a professor of geography at the University of Idaho, in an email. “I was running a few numbers this morning, and the last 60 days have been record warm from Spokane, Washington, to Medford, Oregon; both Seattle and Missoula earlier this summer set records for the longest number of days without measurable rain.”This excessive heat can have an outsize effect on the size of forest fires. For more than three decades, wildfire researchers have known that fire and aridity, which is controlled by heat, exist in an exponential relationship. Every degree of warming does more to promote fire than the previous degree of warming, Williams said.
 “Now, thinking about temperature trends due to human-caused climate change, we think that the western United States is 1.5 [degrees] Celsius, or 3 degrees Fahrenheit, hotter than it would be in absence of climate change. And there’s a heat wave on top of that,” said Williams. “Because of the exponential influence of temperature, that means that this heat wave is having a way worse influence on fire than it would in absence of human-caused warming.”
In the runaway consequences of each additional degree of warming, wildfires are a “canary in the coal mine” for the effects of climate change, Williams said.And global warming is already having an effect on wildfire. In a paper published last year in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Williams and Abatzoglou found that the total area burned in the western United States over the past 33 years was double the size it would have been without any human-caused warming.“The added forest fire area—due to just the degree and a half Celsius of warming—equaled the area of Massachusetts and Connecticut combined,” Williams told me.Fires have not only been increasing in size due to climate change. In the early 20th century, state and federal governments began aggressively fighting wildfires and trying to keep them as small as possible. This has caused denser and more fire-prone forests than the long-term average for the West, which has led to more massive and uncontrollable fires.People have also lengthened the season by starting fires—through errant fireworks, unattended campfires, or arson—earlier in the spring and later in the fall. In a human-free environment, fires could only start after a lightning strike, which only follow from summertime thunderstorms.

“Since the 1980s, we’ve only burnt about 10 percent of the western U.S. forests. And that number to me means that there’s still a whole lot more to burn,” Williams said. He estimated that it would take another several decades for that excess century of fuel to burn out of the American woods. And in the meantime, the planet will only get hotter.

“According to climate models, by the end of this century, the western United States is still projected to warm by about another 3.5 degrees Celsius,” he told me. “And when we remember that the relationship between temperature and fire is exponential … we’re really talking about a very different western United States in 50 years.”

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